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I am animating a CALayer along a CGPath (QuadCurve) quite nicely in iOS. But I'd like to use a more interesting easing function than the few provided by Apple (EaseIn/EaseOut etc). For instance, a bounce or elastic function.

These things are possible to do with MediaTimingFunction (bezier):

enter image description here

But I'd like to create timing functions that are more complex. Problem is that media timing seems to require a cubic bezier which is not powerful enough to create these effects:

enter image description here

The code to create the above is simple enough in other frameworks, which makes this very frustrating. Note that the curves are mapping input time to output time (T-t curve) and not time-position curves. For instance, easeOutBounce(T) = t returns a new t. Then that t is used to plot the movement (or whatever property we should animate).

So, I'd like to create a complex custom CAMediaTimingFunction but I have no clue how to do that, or if it's even possible? Are there any alternatives?

EDIT:

Here is a concrete example in to steps. Very educational :)

  1. I want to animate an object along a line from point a to b, but I want it to "bounce" its movement along the line using the easeOutBounce curve above. This means it will follow the exact line from a to b, but will accelerate and decelerate in a more complex way than what is possible using the current bezier-based CAMediaTimingFunction.

  2. Lets make that line any arbitrary curve movement specified with CGPath. It should still move along that curve, but it should accelerate and decelerate the same way as in the line example.

In theory I think it should work like this:

Lets describe the movement curve as a keyframe animation move(t) = p, where t is time [0..1], p is position calculated at time t. So move(0) returns the position at the start of curve, move(0.5) the exact middle and move(1) at end. Using a an timing function time(T) = t to provide the t values for move should give me what I want. For a bouncing effect, the timing function should return the same t values for time(0.8) and time(0.8) (just an example). Just replace the timing function to get a different effect.

(Yes, it's possible to do line-bouncing by creating and joining four line segments which goes back and forth, but that shouldn't be necessary. After all, it's just a simple linear function which maps time values to positions.)

I hope I'm making sense here.

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5 Answers 5

I found this:

Cocoa with Love - Parametric acceleration curves in Core Animation

But I think it can be made a little simpler and more readable by using blocks. So we can define a category on CAKeyframeAnimation that looks something like this:

CAKeyframeAnimation+Parametric.h:

// this should be a function that takes a time value between 
//  0.0 and 1.0 (where 0.0 is the beginning of the animation
//  and 1.0 is the end) and returns a scale factor where 0.0
//  would produce the starting value and 1.0 would produce the
//  ending value
typedef double (^KeyframeParametricBlock)(double);

@interface CAKeyframeAnimation (Parametric)

+ (id)animationWithKeyPath:(NSString *)path 
      function:(KeyframeParametricBlock)block
      fromValue:(double)fromValue
      toValue:(double)toValue;

CAKeyframeAnimation+Parametric.m:

@implementation CAKeyframeAnimation (Parametric)

+ (id)animationWithKeyPath:(NSString *)path 
      function:(KeyframeParametricBlock)block
      fromValue:(double)fromValue
      toValue:(double)toValue {
  // get a keyframe animation to set up
  CAKeyframeAnimation *animation = 
    [CAKeyframeAnimation animationWithKeyPath:path];
  // break the time into steps
  //  (the more steps, the smoother the animation)
  NSUInteger steps = 100;
  NSMutableArray *values = [NSMutableArray arrayWithCapacity:steps];
  double time = 0.0;
  double timeStep = 1.0 / (double)(steps - 1);
  for(NSUInteger i = 0; i < steps; i++) {
    double value = fromValue + (block(time) * (toValue - fromValue));
    [values addObject:[NSNumber numberWithDouble:value]];
    time += timeStep;
  }
  // we want linear animation between keyframes, with equal time steps
  animation.calculationMode = kCAAnimationLinear;
  // set keyframes and we're done
  [animation setValues:values];
  return(animation);
}

@end

Now usage will look something like this:

// define a parametric function
KeyframeParametricBlock function = ^double(double time) {
  return(1.0 - pow((1.0 - time), 2.0));
};

if (layer) {
  [CATransaction begin];
    [CATransaction 
      setValue:[NSNumber numberWithFloat:2.5]
      forKey:kCATransactionAnimationDuration];

    // make an animation
    CAAnimation *drop = [CAKeyframeAnimation 
      animationWithKeyPath:@"position.y"
      function:function fromValue:30.0 toValue:450.0];
    // use it
    [layer addAnimation:drop forKey:@"position"];

  [CATransaction commit];
}

I know it might not be quite as simple as what you wanted, but it's a start.

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A way to create a custom timing function is by using the functionWithControlPoints:::: factory method in CAMediaTimingFunction (there is a corresponding initWithControlPoints:::: init method as well). What this does is create a Bézier curve for your timing function. It is not an arbitrary curve, but Bézier curves are very powerful and flexible. It takes a little practice to get the hang of the control points. A tip: most drawing programs can create Bézier curves. Playing with those will give you a visual feedback on the curve you are representing with the control points.

The this link points to apple's documentation. There is a short but useful section on how the pre-build functions are constructed from curves.

Edit: The following code shows a simple bounce animation. For doing so, I created a composed timing function (values and timing NSArray properties) and gave each segment of the animation a different time length (keytimes property). In this way you can compose Bézier curves to compose more sophisticated timing for animations. This is a good article on this type of animations with a nice sample code.

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    UIView *v = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0.0, 0.0, 50.0, 50.0)];

    v.backgroundColor = [UIColor redColor];
    CGFloat y = self.view.bounds.size.height;
    v.center = CGPointMake(self.view.bounds.size.width/2.0, 50.0/2.0);
    [self.view addSubview:v];

    //[CATransaction begin];

    CAKeyframeAnimation * animation; 
    animation = [CAKeyframeAnimation animationWithKeyPath:@"position.y"]; 
    animation.duration = 3.0; 
    animation.removedOnCompletion = NO;
    animation.fillMode = kCAFillModeForwards;

    NSMutableArray *values = [NSMutableArray array];
    NSMutableArray *timings = [NSMutableArray array];
    NSMutableArray *keytimes = [NSMutableArray array];

    //Start
    [values addObject:[NSNumber numberWithFloat:25.0]];
    [timings addObject:GetTiming(kCAMediaTimingFunctionEaseIn)];
    [keytimes addObject:[NSNumber numberWithFloat:0.0]];


    //Drop down
    [values addObject:[NSNumber numberWithFloat:y]];
    [timings addObject:GetTiming(kCAMediaTimingFunctionEaseOut)];
    [keytimes addObject:[NSNumber numberWithFloat:0.6]];


    // bounce up
    [values addObject:[NSNumber numberWithFloat:0.7 * y]];
    [timings addObject:GetTiming(kCAMediaTimingFunctionEaseIn)];
    [keytimes addObject:[NSNumber numberWithFloat:0.8]];


    // fihish down
    [values addObject:[NSNumber numberWithFloat:y]];
    [keytimes addObject:[NSNumber numberWithFloat:1.0]];
    //[timings addObject:GetTiming(kCAMediaTimingFunctionEaseIn)];



    animation.values = values;
    animation.timingFunctions = timings;
    animation.keyTimes = keytimes;

    [v.layer addAnimation:animation forKey:nil];   

    //[CATransaction commit];

}
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1  
Problem is that cubic beziers are limited and it's not possible to create for instance "bounce" effects with them. –  Martin Wickman Mar 2 '11 at 7:54
    
Yes that is true. You can combine multiple timing functions using the values and timingFunctions properties of CAKeyframeAnimation to achieve what you want. I'll work out an example and put the code in a bit. –  Felz Mar 2 '11 at 10:30
1  
A rather long bit ... but posted the code! –  Felz Mar 3 '11 at 9:32
    
Thanks for you efforts, and points for trying :) That approach may work in theory, but it needs to be customized for each use. I'm looking for a general solution which works for all animations as a timing function. To be honest it doesn't look that good piecing lines and curves together. The "jack in a box" example also suffers from this. –  Martin Wickman Mar 3 '11 at 19:41
1  
You can specify a CGPathRef instead of an array of values to a keyframe animation, but in the end Felz is correct--CAKeyframeAnimation and timingFunctions will give you everything you need. I'm not sure why you think that's not a "general solution" that has to be "customized for each use". You build up the keyframe animation once in a factory method or something and you can then add that animation to any layer over and over as many times as you like. Why would it need customized for each use? Seems to me it's no different from your notion of how timing functions ought to work. –  Matt Long Mar 3 '11 at 23:16

Not sure if you're still looking, but PRTween looks fairly impressive in terms of its ability to go beyond what Core Animation gives you out of the box, most notably, custom timing functions. It also comes packaged with many—if not all—of the popular easing curves that various web frameworks provide.

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Looks very promising indeed! –  Martin Wickman Oct 18 '12 at 7:08
    
Just looked at PRTween - it's been a long time since I've seen 'goto' used in code!. The animations work pretty well in the demo though. The bounce looks good. –  bandejapaisa Jun 28 '13 at 15:12

I know That This Question Has very useful Answer but I put Very Important Link That Exactly OP Wants..

https://github.com/NachoSoto/NSBKeyframeAnimation

In This Link all most Animation that are describe in OP's Image are covered.

Check out This Link and Find Source of Code. It is Very Useful For beginner.

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It was quite some time ago I wrote this, but I'm (was) looking for something that uses the easing functions to calculate the time. This lib, like the other suggestions, calculates the positions using the easing function, not the time. Re-read my example (point 1) where I talk about moving an object along a simple line, using a timing function. –  Martin Wickman Jul 16 '13 at 16:14
    
It's not possible to provide a CGPath to this lib (afaik), only a property which should be animated. –  Martin Wickman Jul 16 '13 at 16:15

I took Jesse Crossen's response, and expanded on it a bit. You can use it to animate CGPoints, CGSize, For example as of iOS 7, you can also use arbitrary time functions with UIView animations.

You can check out the results at https://github.com/jjackson26/JMJParametricAnimation

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