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Thanks gentlemen! Works perfectly now. Java has made me stupid :(

I am having some difficulty comparing strings in C. I get correct output when I don't use my isMorse function, but when I use it the output becomes inaccurate and displays random characters. As far as I can tell, the variable "morse" is actually changed when strcmp is called on it. I am thinking that it has to do with "morse" not being a constant, but I am unsure of how to remedy it.

Thanks!!

char *EnglishToMorse(char english)
{
   static char *morse;

   int i;
   for (i = 0; i < LOOKUP_SIZE; i++)
   {
      if (lookup[i].character == english)
      {
         morse = lookup[i].morse;
         return morse;
      }
   }

   morse = &english;  // Problem was here!!!
   return morse;
}
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1  
You say the "output becomes inaccurate", but your sample code doesn't have any output statements. Please post a short, complete, runnable example that demonstrates the behaviour you are seeing (don't forget to mention what you expect to see, too). –  Greg Hewgill Mar 2 '11 at 0:48
3  
Are you sure EnglishToMorse is returning a NULL terminated string? –  Tim Cooper Mar 2 '11 at 0:49
2  
strcmp(const char*, const char*) shouldn't change your morse variable –  Marlon Mar 2 '11 at 0:49
1  
What is the lookup array? Beware whitespace (spaces, tabs, line breaks): "---" is not the same as "---\n" or "--- ". –  pmg Mar 2 '11 at 0:53
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5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The reason your morse variable appears to change is because it points to an area on the stack. The reason it points to an area on the stack is because you assigned it the address of your parameter english, which got pushed onto the stack when you called your function then popped off the stack once the function completed.

Now your morse variable will point to whatever memory takes that same location on the stack, which will constantly change throughout the lifetime of your program.

In my opinion, the best way to fix this problem would be to return a NULL pointer from EnglishToMorse if the character is not A-Z... then check for the NULL pointer in your isMorse function. After all, it's good practice to check for NULL pointers in code.

char* EnglishToMorse(char english)
{
    int i;

    english = toupper(english);
    for (i = 0; i < LOOKUP_SIZE; i++)
    {
        if (lookup[i].character == english)
            return lookup[i].morse;
    }

    return NULL;
}

int isMorse(char* morse)
{
    int i;

    /* Check for NULL, so strcmp doesn't fail. */
    if (morse == NULL) return 0;

    for (i = 0; i < LOOKUP_SIZE; i++)
    {
        if(strcmp(morse, lookup[i].morse) == 0) 
            return 1;
    }

    return 0;
}
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I have a little guess. The function EnglishToMorse() might be returning a pointer to memory from the stack. If so, running another function after EnglishToMorse() will alter that memory. This would be due to a mistake in EnglishToMorse() -- declaring a local array of char and returning a pointer to it.

Without seeing the code for EnglishToMorse(), this is just a stab in the dark. You could provide us more code to look at, and win.

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1  
+1 - this sounds most likely if the data is ok without calling isMorse() because it might still be sitting on the stack. Calling another function will cause new contents to be pushed on the stack instead. –  Gavin H Mar 2 '11 at 0:52
    
I posted my EnglishToMorse function. Thanks for the reply. –  Cory Mar 2 '11 at 1:04
    
Should I have passed "morse" into EnglishToMorse() as an additional parameter instead of declaring it a local static variable? –  Cory Mar 2 '11 at 1:07
    
@Cory See my answer. –  Jim Balter Mar 2 '11 at 1:20
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You have a static variable in EnglishToMorse, but it's the wrong one. There's no need for morse to be static -- you simply return it. But you do need english to be static -- rather than on the stack -- since you return its address. Also, it needs to be a NUL-terminated string. Do something like

char *EnglishToMorse(char english)
{
   static char save_english[2]; /* initialized to 0's */ 

   int i;
   for (i = 0; i < LOOKUP_SIZE; i++)
      if (lookup[i].character == english)
         return lookup[i].morse;

   save_english[0] = english;
   return save_english;
}

Note, however, that the caller of EnglishToMorse must use the result or save it before EnglishToMorse is called again, since the second call may overwrite static_english.

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Ah, thanks! Worked like a charm! –  Cory Mar 2 '11 at 1:24
1  
@Cory Don't forget to accept an answer. There are several good ones here, not just mine. –  Jim Balter Mar 2 '11 at 1:35
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It looks like the problem is likely in this function:

char *EnglishToMorse(char english) {
    static char *morse;
    // ...
    morse = &english;
    return morse;
}

You are returning the address of a parameter (english) that's passed into the function. This parameter ceases to exist after the function returns (and before the caller gets a chance to actually see the value). It appears as though you've attempted to fix this by declaring the morse variable static, but this only makes the morse variable itself static, not whatever it points to.

Also, strings in C must be terminated with a NUL character. By returning a pointer to a single character (as in english), there is no guarantee that the next byte in memory is or is not a NUL character. So the caller, who is expecting to see a NUL-terminated string, may get more than they bargained for.

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char *EnglishToMorse(char english)
and
morse = &english;
are the problem.

You should never return a pointer to a local variable or a function parameter.

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