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Given any object with members that look like this:

target
{
    x1 : 1
    x2 : 2
    x3 : 3
    y1 : 6
    y2 : 5
    y3 : 4
}

I need to transform the object into something like this:

target
{
    x : [1, 2, 3]
    y : [6, 5, 4]
}

From the basic JavaScript I know, it seems like the following function would work:

function joinParameters(target, paramName) {
    var count = 1;
    var array = [];
    var name = paramName.concat(count);
    var value = target[name];
    while (typeof value != undefined) {
        array.push(value);
        name = paramName.concat(count);
    }
    target[paramName] = array;
}

So, I could say joinParameters(target, "x"); The problem, however, is that

    var value = target[name];

is always undefined. I followed the code in FireBug to make sure that the target object has the property that I'm trying to get, and it does. So, I'm not quite sure what's wrong.

If jQuery has an elegant way of doing this, then I would prefer that solution.

share|improve this question
1  
Do you mean to use .join instead of .concat? .concat will return an array, and .join will return a string. –  NT3RP Mar 2 '11 at 1:42
    
i think he meant to do a substr actually.. because paramName is a string –  zachallia Mar 2 '11 at 1:45
    
The String object has a concat method too. It was definitely concatenating the strings correctly when I was stepping through the code. ref: w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_concat_string.asp –  Tedderz Mar 2 '11 at 1:51
2  
w3schools has a lot of misleading and incorrect information, it's best not to use it as a reference. –  david Mar 2 '11 at 2:04
1  
'The' reference is here: ecma-international.org/publications/standards/Ecma-262.htm but it's a little hard to read. Mozilla is usually pretty good: developer.mozilla.org/en/Javascript –  david Mar 2 '11 at 2:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using underscore.js:

_(target).keys().reduce(function(memo, key){
    var split = /([^\d]+)([\d]+)/.exec(key);
    memo[split[1]] = memo[split[1]]||[];
    memo[split[1]][parseInt(split[2],10)-1] = target[key];
    return memo;
},{});

Working example:

http://jsfiddle.net/PLgN5/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, David. I appreciate your answer as well as your helpful comments. Answer accepted. –  Tedderz Mar 2 '11 at 3:13
function joinParams(target) {
    var p;

    for (prop in target) {
        p = prop.substr(0, 1);

        if (!target[p]) {
                target[p] = [];
        }

        target[p].push(target[prop]);
    }

    return target;
}

target =
{
    x1 : 1,
    x2 : 2,
    x3 : 3,
    y1 : 6,
    y2 : 5,
    y3 : 4
}

target = joinParams(target);
share|improve this answer
    
yes, this is much cleaner than my slop first try. ha –  zachallia Mar 2 '11 at 2:05

you could do:

function joinParams(o) { 
    var ret = {},
        key;
    for(var i in o) {
        key = i.substr(0,1);
        ret[key] = ret[key] ? ret[key].push(o[i]) && ret[key] : [o[i]];
    } 
    return ret;
}


var target = /* original object */
target = joinParams(target);
share|improve this answer

There are some logic errors in your original code (i.e. infinite loop). Fix:

function joinParameters(target, paramName) {
    var count = 1;
    var array = [];
    var name = paramName.concat(count);
    var value = target[name];
    while (value != undefined) {   /* typeof value will return "undefined". */
        array.push(value);
        /* You need to increment 'count'. */
        name = paramName.concat(++count);
        value = target[name];
    }
    target[paramName] = array;
}

...

joinParameters(target, "x");

Note this function call will add a new element x to target, x1, x2, ..., x6 will still exist in target. In fact, this function doesn't take care of the y element, which I assume you want to "join" as well.

For a more versatile function, the answer by zachallia should do the trick.

share|improve this answer
    
Ugh, yeah, I should have seen that... I only stepping through the first part of the the code in FireBug and wondering about the failed condition. Thanks! –  Tedderz Mar 2 '11 at 2:30

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