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I am inserting a large number of records into a SQLite database on Android. To improve insert times, I am considering creating the index on the table after data has been fully added.

My question is, at what point does the database actually build the index against values on the table? Does it happen as soon as I issue the SQL statement (create index index_name on table ...), or can the database defer it until the first query arrives?

Thanks, Ranjit

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You can create the index (or several) on top of the existing fully populated table. However, I strongly suggest you consider your use cases, then carefully choose the order of indexed columns and then create the index (or indexes) accordingly. You can also find the optimum by experimentation. I have had performance differences up to one order of magnitude just from a clever choice of indexes ... –  0xC0000022L Mar 2 '11 at 4:36
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1 Answer

It creates the index immediately you issue the create index command. The relevant code is in sqlite3CreateIndex and this will create the index and write it to disk (except for the special case where it's called as part of a database open operation but that's not the case when a user creates an index).

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Thanks for your response paxdiablo. I am not dealing with Unique constraints in the data I am working with. Also, I intend to create the index immediately after the last row has been inserted, this way queries will be fast. The intention of deferring the index creation, is to speed up individual inserts and not slow them down by having the database index that individual feature at the same time that it was inserted. Thanks again! –  Ranjit Mar 2 '11 at 3:39
    
@Ranjit, I may have misunderstood you and assumed you intended the index creation deferred until some time after the create index rather than just asking if it could happen. If the latter, no, SQLite creates the index as part of the create index call, it will not defer. In light of that, I can remove a lot of excess from my answer. –  paxdiablo Mar 2 '11 at 4:13
    
but an index can be created independently of the table. So a pre-populated table can be indexed later on. I think this was what he was asking. At least how I understood it. –  0xC0000022L Mar 2 '11 at 4:37
    
@STATUS: yes, it can, but I think OP knows that, since "I am considering creating the index on the table after data has been fully added". The question is more to do with a possible delay between issuing create index and the index creation starting: "Does it happen as soon as I issue the SQL statement (create index index_name on table ...), or can the database defer it until the first query arrives?" –  paxdiablo Mar 2 '11 at 4:45
    
Thanks for the discussions. I now create the index immediately after the last record goes in during a bulk insert operation. I will run some experiments to gauge performance. –  Ranjit Mar 6 '11 at 0:52
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