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Is the following an efficient and problem free way to convert an unsigned int to an int in C++:

#include <limits.h>
void safeConvert(unsigned int passed) 
{
    int variable = static_cast<int>(passed % (INT_MAX+1)); 
    ...
}

Or is there a better way?

UPDATE

As pointed out by James McNellis it is not undefined to assign an unsigned int > INT_MAX to an integer - rather this is implementation defined. As such the context here is now specifically on my preference is to ensure this integer resets to zero when the unsigned int exceeds INT_MAX.

Original Context

I have a number of unsigned int's used as counters, but want to pass them around as integers in a specific case.

Under normal operation these counts will remain within the bounds of INT_MAX. However to avoid running into undefined implementation specific behaviour should the abnormal (but valid) case occur I want some efficient conversion here.

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Should be safeConvert? So, what do you want to happen when the input is greater than INT_MAX? Do you want some flag be set when that is the case? –  Hamish Grubijan Mar 2 '11 at 2:51
    
While overflow during signed arithmetic yields undefined behavior, a conversion to a signed integer type does not: the results are implementation-defined if the value can't be represented by the target type. –  James McNellis Mar 2 '11 at 2:52
    
@Hamish Thanks for the typo catch. When the input is greater than INT_MAX ensuring the int value is > 0 is preferable. –  Glen T Mar 2 '11 at 2:55
    
@James Good point, so technically the assignment is valid as is without any sanitation. So the question here is more about my preference for the value when overflowing would occur? –  Glen T Mar 2 '11 at 2:57
    
I would use an if, but that's just me i guess –  Nate Koppenhaver Mar 2 '11 at 3:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This should also work:

int variable = passed & INT_MAX;
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+1. You beat me by a whole minute... :-) –  Jerry Coffin Mar 2 '11 at 2:51
    
@Jerry: I usually find that it's faster to write code than an explanation. Code is just denser and more succinct, and typing speed is somewhat the limiting factor, at least for me. –  Ben Voigt Mar 2 '11 at 6:17
1  
This solution, while neat, is exploiting an implementation-dependent property of INT_MAX (that it is usually defined as 2**n - 1). The OP's goal specifically was to avoid implementation-defined behavior. Best to check this property by using something like typedef char Test[((INT_MAX + 1u) & ((INT_MAX + 1u) - 1)) == 0]; first ;) –  decltype Mar 2 '11 at 8:55
    
@decltype: I think that property is universally true. But I did consider that. This formula will map every integer into the range (0..INT_MAX) whether or not INT_MAX+1 is a power of 2. –  Ben Voigt Mar 2 '11 at 14:22
1  
@Hamish: True. We do expect those who use code to do a little more than just cut+paste it into their project. They should add comments, fix variable names, adjust style, and do whatever else is necessary to meet their project requirements. And if they don't understand it well enough to write that documentation, they can leave a comment here and ask. –  Ben Voigt Mar 2 '11 at 17:56

Under normal operation these counts will remain within the bounds of INT_MAX. However to avoid running into undefined behaviour should the abnormal (but valid) case occur I want some efficient conversion here.

Efficient conversion to what? If all the shared values for int and unsigned int correspond, and you want other unsigned values such as INT_MAX + 1 to each have distinct values, then you can only map them onto the negative integer values. This is done by default, and can be explicitly requested with static_cast<int>(my_unsigned). Otherwise, you could map them all to 0, or -1, or INT_MIN, or throw away the high bit... easiest way is simply: if (my_unsigned > INT_MAX) my_unsigned = XXX, or ...my_unsigned &= INT_MAX to clear the high bit. But will the called functions work properly if the int overflows? Perhaps a better solution would be to use 64-bit ints to begin with?

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