Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What's the easiest way to parse a file with

[[1, 2, 3, 4], [8, 9, 10, 11], ...]

into a vector of QRectF (a struct with four floats)?

share|improve this question
    
Did you mean four integers? –  Earlz Mar 2 '11 at 2:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

have you looked at boost's spirit library? I think it's an amazing library and if I recall correctly they have examples in the tutorial very similar to what you want.

EDIT: This puts you at about the right place: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/release/libs/spirit/doc/html/spirit/qi/tutorials/warming_up.html

EDIT: Sigh...I haven't looked at c++ in over a year (and I haven't looked at spirit in over 4 years) so this took about an hour to put together. Here's the working example:

# include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
using boost::spirit::qi::int_;
using boost::spirit::qi::char_;
using boost::spirit::qi::lit;
using boost::spirit::ascii::space;
using boost::spirit::ascii::space_type;
using boost::spirit::qi::rule;
using boost::spirit::qi::phrase_parse;

#include <boost/fusion/include/adapt_struct.hpp>

#include <string>
using std::string;

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

#include <vector>
using std::vector;

struct holder {
    int n1;
    int n2;
    int n3;
    int n4;
};
BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT(::holder, (int,n1) (int,n2) (int, n3) (int, n4))

int main() {
    string s = "[[1,2,3,4], [4,3,2,1]]";
    vector<holder> v;

    // I admit it, I was wrong. It's 3 lines of parsing.
    rule<string::iterator, holder(), space_type> holder_p = 
        lit("[") >> int_ >> ',' >> int_ >> ',' >> int_ >> ',' >> int_ >> ']';
    rule<string::iterator, vector<holder>(), space_type > holder_list_p = 
        char('[') >> (holder_p % ',') >> ']';
    bool r = phrase_parse(s.begin(), s.end(), holder_list_p, space, v);

    if (r) {
        for (vector<holder>::const_iterator it = v.begin(); it != v.end(); it++) {
            cout << "n1: " << it->n1 << ", n2: " << it->n2 << 
                    ", n3: " << it->n3 << ", n4: " << it->n4 << endl;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, it looks great. I'll try to modify one of the examples. Thanks. –  Neil G Mar 2 '11 at 3:00
    
Update: Spirit is kind of a nightmare for something so simple. –  Neil G Mar 2 '11 at 20:28
    
@Neil G: i've edited in a working spirit example if you're interested... –  Kevin Mar 2 '11 at 22:55
    
that is really amazing. This should be one of the examples! –  Neil G Mar 2 '11 at 23:08
    
also, thanks for doing it in Google style ;) –  Neil G Mar 2 '11 at 23:08

IMO, Spirit is probably a bit of overkill for the job at hand. The format is simple enough that you can handle it pretty easily with the standard library. The real question is whether you need to check that the data is in the right format (verify the presence of all the brackets and comma) or if you just want to read the numbers. If you need to verify the format, you could do something like this:

// warning: untested code.
bool verify(char a, char b) { 
    return a == b;
}

std::istream &operator>>(std::istream &is, QRectF &r) { 
     char bracket, comma;
     float num[4];
     bool good = true;

     is >> bracket;
     good &= verify(bracket, '[');
     for (int i=0; i<3; i++) {
         is >> num[i] >> comma;
         good &= verify(comma, ',');
     }
     is >> num[3];
     is >> bracket >> comma;
     good &= verify(bracket, ']');
     good &= verify(comma, ',');

     if (!good)
         is.setf(std::ios::failbit);
     else 
         for (int i=0; i<4; i++)
             r.value[i] = num[i];
     return is;
}

If you don't care about verifying the format, you can do pretty much the same, but get rid of all the verify stuff, as well as setting the stream state.

Alternatively, you can create a locale that treats everything except numbers as whitespace, so reading the data becomes trivial:

// warning: untested code:
struct digits_only: std::ctype<char> {
    digits_only(): std::ctype<char>(get_table()) {}

    static std::ctype_base::mask const* get_table() {
        static std::vector<std::ctype_base::mask> 
            rc(std::ctype<char>::table_size,std::ctype_base::space);

        std::fill(&rc['0'], &rc['9'], std::ctype_base::digit);
        return &rc[0];
    }
};

std::istream &operator>>(std::istream &is, QRectF &r) { 
    return is >> r.value[0] >> r.value[1] >> r.value[2] >> r.value[3];
}

int main() { 
    std::vector<QRectF> rects;
    std::ifstream infile("myfile.txt");
    infile.imbue(std::locale(std::locale(), new digits_only());

    std::copy(std::istream_iterator<QRectF>(infile),
              std::istream_iterator<QRectF>(),
              std::back_inserter(rects));
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, spirit is potentially overkill because of the dependencies. Your code could be better commented, though ;) –  0xC0000022L Mar 2 '11 at 3:59
2  
I hate it when people make claims like this. Spirit would do the job in like 1 line of very easy to read (and dare I say maintain) code. I like to say that there isn't bugs in code you don't have to write. Look how long that code is you wrote...why would you punish yourself like that?! –  Kevin Mar 2 '11 at 4:03
1  
@Kevin: First of all, it's a bit more than one line. Second, for those who aren't accustomed to it, Spirit is almost completely unreadable. Third, in the first example above, about half the code is dedicated to something Spirit won't do anyway. Fourth, when/if you use a debugger, Spirit can be next to impossible to deal with at all. Fifth, while this particular parser probably won't cause a problem, doing anything large or complex with Spirit can lead to extremely long compile times. Sixth, while shorter code has benefits, it's hardly the sole measure of quality. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 2 '11 at 4:23
1  
@kevin: The bottom line is that your hatred has little effect on reality, and the reality is that for a lot of people, Spirit is (and will remain) much more novel and impressive than truly useful. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 2 '11 at 4:26
1  
@Jerry: I provided a link to documentation that gives several working examples. I try to avoid doing other people's work for them; since I have my own day job to worry about! –  Kevin Mar 2 '11 at 14:13

A very simple and straightforward approach is to let the old scanf to deal with the formatted input:

QRectF rectf;
// deal with opening square bracket here.
int r = fscanf (file, "[%f, %f, %f, %f]", 
                &rectf.a, &rectf.b,
                &rectf.c, &rectf.d);
if (r == 4)
    // pasring succeeded.
// consume whitespaces and a comma/closing square-bracket here.

A complete C program that could read and parse an input file into QRectF objects is given below:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>

typedef struct 
{
  float a;
  float b;
  float c;
  float d;
} QRectF;

static void skip_whitespaces (FILE*);

int
main (int argc, char** argv)
{ 
  FILE* file = NULL; 

  if (argc <= 1)
    {
      printf ("please specify file name.\n");
      return 1;
    }

  file = fopen (argv[1], "r");

  if (!file)
    {
      printf ("failed to open file.\n");
      return 1;
    }
  if (fgetc (file) != '[')
    {
      printf ("expected [ not found.\n");
      fclose (file);
      return 0;
    }

  while (!feof (file))
    {
      QRectF rectf;
      int r, c;

      skip_whitespaces (file);
      r = fscanf (file, "[%f, %f, %f, %f]", 
                  &rectf.a, &rectf.b, &rectf.c, &rectf.d);
      if (r != 4)
        {
          printf ("invalid data format.\n");
          break;
        }
      else
        printf ("%f, %f, %f, %f\n", rectf.a, rectf.b, rectf.c, rectf.d);

      skip_whitespaces (file);  
      c = fgetc (file);
      if (c == ']')
        break;
      else if (c != ',')
        {
          printf ("expected , not found.\n");
          break;
        }
    }

  fclose (file);
  return 0;
}

static void 
skip_whitespaces (FILE* file)
{
  while (!feof (file))
    {
      int c = fgetc (file);
      if (!isspace (c))
        {
          ungetc (c, file);
          break;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.