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I have a huge xlsx file (aboutn 127 MB) and want to read using Spreadsheet::Excel module, but i am getting "Out of Memory" errors on 2GB RAM machine. (Note the script works fine with smaller excel 2007 files)

Is there any way to read the excel file line by line without hitting the memory limit.? searching google i came across http://discuss.joelonsoftware.com/default.asp?joel.3.160328.14 but i am not familar on how to store the spreadsheet into a scalar. Can someone gimme an example of reading excel 2007 files as scalar and printing cell values. Below is the current script i am running on smaller spreadsheets.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use Excel::Writer::XLSX;
use Spreadsheet::XLSX;
my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new('Book1.xlsx');
my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
#  use strict;
my $excel = Spreadsheet::XLSX -> new ('Book2.xlsx');
my $date_format = $workbook->add_format();
$date_format->set_num_format('dd/mm/yy hh:mm');
# Columns of interest
@columns=(0,1,2,5,9,10,12,13,31);
@reportlist=("string1","String2","String3");
@actuallist=("ModifiedString1","ModifiedString2","ModifiedString3");
$max_list=$#reportlist;
foreach my $sheet (@{$excel -> {Worksheet}}) {
    printf("Sheet: %s\n", $sheet->{Name});
    $sheet -> {MaxRow} ||= $sheet -> {MinRow};
        foreach my $row ($sheet -> {MinRow} .. $sheet -> {MaxRow}) {
            $sheet -> {MaxCol} ||= $sheet -> {MinCol};
            for ($c=0;$c<=$#columns;$c++){
                $col=$columns[$c];
                my $cell = $sheet -> {Cells} [$row] [$col];
                    if($col==0){
                    $cell->{Val}=~ s/\ GMT\+11\:00//g;
                    $worksheet->write($row,$c,$cell->{Val},$date_format);
                    }
                    if ($cell) {
                        $worksheet->write($row,$c,$cell -> {Val});
                            for($z=0;$z<=$#reportisplist;$z++){
                                if(($cell->{Val})=~ m/$reportlist[$z]/i){
                                $worksheet->write($row,$c,$actuallist[$z]);
                                }
                            }
                    }
            }
        }
}
$workbook->close();
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm working on a new module for fast and memory efficient reading of Excel xlsx files with Perl. It isn't on CPAN yet (it needs a good bit more work) but you can get it on GitHub.

Here is a example of how to use it:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Excel::Reader::XLSX;

my $reader   = Excel::Reader::XLSX->new();
my $workbook = $reader->read_file( 'Book1.xlsx' );

if ( !defined $workbook ) {
    die $reader->error(), "\n";
}

for my $worksheet ( $workbook->worksheets() ) {

    my $sheetname = $worksheet->name();

    print "Sheet = $sheetname\n";

    while ( my $row = $worksheet->next_row() ) {

        while ( my $cell = $row->next_cell() ) {

            my $row   = $cell->row();
            my $col   = $cell->col();
            my $value = $cell->value();

            print "  Cell ($row, $col) = $value\n";
        }
    }
}

__END__

Update: This module never made it to CPAN quality. Try Spreadsheet::ParseXLSX instead.

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1  
Waiting for it to come on CPAN... –  Incognito Feb 23 '12 at 6:41
    
@Incognito: from the Projects README: This project is effectively abandoned. –  René Nyffenegger Oct 28 '14 at 6:33

Have you tried converting the XLSX into csv and reading it as a plain text file?

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Not yet. Will i still have out of memory issues with CSV? –  Linus Mar 2 '11 at 5:17
2  
@user572059 Shouldn't happen if you read it line by line. –  hlynur Mar 2 '11 at 5:21
2  
Since it will not read the entire file into memory and use almost no data structures, you are not likely to have out of memory errors. I have handled csv files larger than this without any problem. –  Rasika Mar 2 '11 at 5:22
    
@Rasika thanks will look at example on reading CSV files. –  Linus Mar 2 '11 at 5:35
    
@Rasika all good now, saving xlsx as csv and running it was so much quicker. Thanks for the tip –  Linus Mar 4 '11 at 4:08

Try this one. Assuming you have installed Spreadsheet::Read perl module which can determine the actual parser module to use for reading a file, below code fragments read and prints the cell of 1st worksheet of the input workbook. You can examine $workbook object to see all the options available to configure. This module can be used to read files in other formats like "csv", "xls" as well. Here is the link to tutorial which I found to be useful: http://search.cpan.org/~hmbrand/Spreadsheet-Read/Read.pm

ReadData can be configured by passing options. It has many options out of each 2 options which are "cells" and "rc" can be used to modify behaviour related to file reading.By default both options are set to true. If the "cells" is true then ReadData stores cells of the workbook in a hash in returned object. If the "rc" is true then ReadData stores cells of the workbook in an array in the returned object. In the below code fragment, by setting cells => 0 , the contents of the sheet will not be stored in a hash format in returned $workbook object thus saving some space in memory. By default this option is true i.e. 1 and so . Also to further prevent from reading complete file, you can set option "rc" to false as well.

use Spreadsheet::Read;
############################################################################
# function input  : file in xlsx format with absolute path 
# function output : prints 1st worksheet content if exist
############################################################################
sub print_xlsx_file{

    my $file_path = shift;
    my $workbook = ReadData($file_path,cells => 0 );
    if(defined $workbook->[0]{'error'}){
        print "Error occurred while processing $file_path:".
              $workbook->[0]{'error'}."\n";
        exit(-1);
    }
    my $worksheet = $workbook->[1];
    my $max_rows = $worksheet->{'maxrow'};
    my $max_cols = $worksheet->{'maxcol'};

    for my $row_num (1..($max_rows))
    {
        for my $col_num (1..($max_cols)){
            print $worksheet->{'cell'}[$col_num][$row_num]."\n";
        }
    }
}
# call above function
# print_xlsx_file("/home/chammu/mybook.xlsx");
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