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Question:

I have a generic list, like this:

System.Collections.Generic.List<Question> myquestions = new System.Collections.Generic.List<Question>();

And I have a paging example, using a LINQ table acquried from database, doing this for paging:

var questions = context.Questions
    .OrderBy(sidx + " " + sord)
    .Skip(pageIndex * pageSize)
    .Take(pageSize);

Right now, for paging my populated from code list, I have:

var questionss = myquestions
    .OrderBy(x => x.Id)
    .Skip(pageIndex * pageSize)
    .Take(pageSize);

And what I want is being able to order "myquestions" by a string as in the above example. Is that possible?

share|improve this question
    
Can you give examples of what sidx and sord would look like? Where do you get sidx and sord from. That is how do these change for every record? –  Shiv Kumar Mar 2 '11 at 8:07
    
example: sidx = "Id", sord = "ASC" –  Quandary Mar 2 '11 at 8:15
2  

5 Answers 5

Please check my answer to another question on how to build a custom OrderBy predicate using Expression from a given String.

share|improve this answer
    
I like it, but it still needs to be extended by using list.OrderByDescending(x => x.Id) when sortd is DESC. The problem is I don't quite understand it, YET (but I get the idea)... –  Quandary Mar 2 '11 at 8:21
    
Thanks, the answer by dtb in your link is perfect. –  Quandary Mar 2 '11 at 8:29
    
@Quandary: Well that's easy to implement in this solution, you don't need to modify too much. But the more dynamic, the more work(probably the slower). Follow @JSkeet's solution if you don't want it too dynamic. –  Danny Chen Mar 2 '11 at 8:29
    
@Quandary: LOL I don't know I should be happy or sad :( –  Danny Chen Mar 2 '11 at 8:30
    
Hmm, sad! Sad that I didn't realize the problem in those 10 seconds. See my answer. –  Quandary Mar 2 '11 at 11:25

One option is to create a dictionary from each possible ordering string to an appropriate delegate. For example:

Dictionary<string, Func<IEnumerable<Question>, IEnumerable<Question>> orderings =
    new Dictionary<string, Func<IEnumerable<Question>, IEnumerable<Question>>()
{
    { "Id",  questions => questions.OrderBy(x => x.Id) },
    { "Title",  questions => questions.OrderBy(x => x.Title) },
    { "Answer",  questions => questions.OrderBy(x => x.Answer) },
    { "Id Desc",  questions => questions.OrderByDescending(x => x.Id) },
    { "Title Desc",  questions => questions.OrderByDescending(x => x.Title) },
    { "Answer Desc",  questions => questions.OrderByDescending(x => x.Answer) },
};

Then you can find that mapping at execution time, and apply the function.

share|improve this answer
    
I get the idea, but it's gonna create an awful lot of typing, plus it will be a 2d dictionary, because it also needs sort order ASC|DESC. Automatizing this would probably require reflection. –  Quandary Mar 2 '11 at 8:17
    
@Quandary: You could always sort ascending and use Reverse if you want a descending list. I'd guess either the Linq query optimizer or the SQL server are smart enough to optimize that away and do a descending sort instead. –  nikie Mar 2 '11 at 8:19
    
@Quandary: Just add extra options - editing... –  Jon Skeet Mar 2 '11 at 8:20
    
I'll remember that if I need very custom search order. –  Quandary Mar 2 '11 at 9:15

You could look at Dynamic Linq. IIRC it was a sample that shipped with VS2008, I'm not 100% sure if it's still included in VS2010.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, see my answer for the Dynamic solution. –  Quandary Mar 2 '11 at 12:03

You can chain the extension methods in separate statements thanks to the lazy execution, which means that you can add different sorting depending on a condition:

IOrderedQueryable<Question> sorted;
switch (sort) {
  case "Id":  sorted = myquestions.OrderBy(x => x.Id);
  case "Name": sorted = myquestions.OrderBy(x => x.Name);
  case "Size": sorted = myquestions.OrderBy(x => x.Size);
  case "Id Desc":  sorted = myquestions.OrderByDescending(x => x.Id);
  case "Name Desc": sorted = myquestions.OrderByDescending(x => x.Name);
  case "Size Desc": sorted = myquestions.OrderByDescending(x => x.Size);
  default: throw new NotImplementedException();
}
var questions = sorted.Skip(pageIndex * pageSize).Take(pageSize);

You can even add a secondary sorting (or as many as you like, after the first they are all the same):

IOrderedQueryable<Question> sorted;
switch (sort) {
  case "Id":  sorted = myquestions.OrderBy(x => x.Id);
  case "Name": sorted = myquestions.OrderBy(x => x.Name);
  case "Size": sorted = myquestions.OrderBy(x => x.Size);
  case "Id Desc":  sorted = myquestions.OrderByDescending(x => x.Id);
  case "Name Desc": sorted = myquestions.OrderByDescending(x => x.Name);
  case "Size Desc": sorted = myquestions.OrderByDescending(x => x.Size);
  default: throw new NotImplementedException();
}
switch (sort2) {
  case "Id":  sorted = sorted.ThenBy(x => x.Id);
  case "Name": sorted = sorted.ThenBy(x => x.Name);
  case "Size": sorted = sorted.ThenBy(x => x.Size);
  case "Id Desc":  sorted = sorted.ThenByDescending(x => x.Id);
  case "Name Desc": sorted = sorted.ThenByDescending(x => x.Name);
  case "Size Desc": sorted = sorted.ThenByDescending(x => x.Size);
}
var questions = sorted.Skip(pageIndex * pageSize).Take(pageSize);
share|improve this answer
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Bahaha, now I'm gonna cry:

Trying to implement dtb's solution, I saw the problem:

OrderByField<T>(IQueryable<T> q,

Returns IQueryable while inputting IQueryable... lol bs. So, the real question is how to convert List to be iQueryable.

Which, in fact is dead simple:

var list = new List<T>(); 
var queryable = list.AsQueryable(); 

then

queryable.OrderBy(sidx + " " + sord);

So the final solution is as trivial as:

myquestions.AsQueryable().OrderBy(sidx + " " + sord).Skip(pageIndex * pageSize).Take(pageSize);

Which also means Linq.Table implements IQueryable, which makes sense IMHO.

Edit:
Note:
This requires reference to: Dynamic.dll (not System.Dynamic.dll) as well as

using System.Linq.Dynamic;

If you don't reference Dynamic.dll, or don't declare the using directive, you'll get an error on AsQueryable().

share|improve this answer
    
This is the best answer by miles. If you don't have System.Linq.Dynamic, just use nuget to get it. –  MGOwen Jul 13 '13 at 1:00

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