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I think I should mention I'm trying to get Entity Framework\SQL server to do something that I was used to coming from Rails. I really just want to know the 'best' way to have automatic created_at & updated_at column values for records that I insert/update in the database.

Right now I've hooked into the ObjectContext.SavingChanges event and things are working well. After I wrote and tested my code however I realize that there may be a better or faster way to do this.

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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

One method is to use insert/update triggers to set the created_at and updated_at columns to the current time.

The Insert trigger would look something like this:

CREATE TRIGGER [dbo].[inserted_myTable] ON [dbo].[myTable] AFTER INSERT
AS 
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    UPDATE [dbo].[myTable] Set AdmitDateTime = GetDate() where pkid in (SELECT pkid FROM Inserted)
END


The Update trigger would look something like this:

CREATE TRIGGER [dbo].[updated_myTable] ON  [dbo].[myTable] AFTER UPDATE
AS 
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    UPDATE [dbo].[myTable] Set AdmitDateTime = GetDate() where pkid in (SELECT pkid FROM Inserted)
END


One advantage of the trigger approach is that the time/date will always be in the same time zone. Another advantage is that if someone modifies the database record outside of your application, the fields are still updated.

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+1, thanks. What is the NOCOUNT for? –  Greg Feb 17 '10 at 11:37
    
See here for an explaination of NOCOUNT: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189837.aspx –  Friend Of George Feb 25 '10 at 17:36
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