Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicates:
In C#: Math.Round(2.5) result is 2 (instead of 3)! Are you kidding me?
.Net Round Bug

I have a halfway value (number.5) and I need to specify how this will be rounded (upper or lower value.)

I understand the behaviour of Math.Round with the MidPointRounding parameter but that does not solve my problem:

// To Even
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(4.4)); // 4
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(4.5)); // 4
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(4.6)); // 5
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(5.5)); // 6

// AwayFromZero
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(4.4)); // 4
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(4.5)); // 5
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(4.6)); // 5
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(5.5)); // 6

// in one case I need 
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(4.4)); // 4
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(4.5)); // 4
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(4.6)); // 5
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(5.5)); // 5

// another case I need
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(4.4)); // 4
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(4.5)); // 5
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(4.6)); // 5
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(5.5)); // 6
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by CodesInChaos, adrianbanks, Rowland Shaw, BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft, Graviton Mar 3 '11 at 3:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
    
this is not a dup, he is looking for a way to midpoint round towards zero or possible towards -inf (can't tell which cos all the examples are positive) –  jk. Mar 2 '11 at 10:16
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have a overload to Math.Round that take a enum value from MidpointRounding.

This has two options:

  • ToEven (default) Also called bankers rounding. Will round to the nearest pair. So 2.5 becomes 2, while 3.5 becomes 4.
  • AwayFromZero: Always round X.5 up to X+1; So 2.5 for example becomes 3.
share|improve this answer
    
If i use Math.Round(3.5,MidpointRounding.ToEven) will always be 4 but I need it to be 3 in some cases –  thedev Mar 2 '11 at 9:07
    
And in which cases do you need it to be 3? If you can mention the cases, maybe I can find a solution for you :) Probably it will involve Math.Floor() or Math.Ceiling() as other have mentioned. –  Øyvind Knobloch-Bråthen Mar 2 '11 at 9:12
    
I think I will need to manually check if I have a halfway value (x.5) and use Floor or Ceiling depending on the case –  thedev Mar 2 '11 at 9:26
1  
So something like if( myValue % 1 == 0.5) FloorOrCeil();. One thing to remember here is that if you are using the double type, 0.5 might not be exactly 0.5 because of floating point precision, so either you should use another data type like decimal, or you need to add a small slack to 0.5 so that values that are "close enough" also count as 0.5. –  Øyvind Knobloch-Bråthen Mar 2 '11 at 9:52
1  
eh? .5 is exactly representable in floating point, if you are not exactly at .5 you don't want to do midpoint rounding anyway –  jk. Mar 2 '11 at 10:12
show 3 more comments

The Round method has two different ways of rounding that you can specify:

value = Math.Round(value, MidpointRounding.ToEven);

and:

value = Math.Round(value, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero);

(If you don't specify a MidpointRounding value, ToEven is used.)

If you want to want to round up, you use the Ceiling method instead:

value = Math.Ceiling(value);

If you want to round down, you use the Floor method:

value = Math.Floor(value);
share|improve this answer
add comment

It seems like what you want is a non-existant MidpointRounding value of TowardsZero or TowardsNegativeInfinity. The only option is to code the rounding yourself.

perhaps something like this: (not tested, and probably doesn't deal well with inf/nan etc)

double RoundTowardNegInfinity(double val)
{
  var frac = val - Math.Truncate(val);
  if (frac == 0.5 || frac == -0.5)
  {
    return Math.Floor(val);
  }
  return Math.Round(val);
}

double RoundTowardZero(double val)
{
  var frac = val - Math.Truncate(val);
  if (frac == 0.5 || frac == -0.5)
  {
    return Math.Truncate(val);
  }
  return Math.Round(val);
}
share|improve this answer
    
note this is one of the few cases where comparing floating point numbers for equality is the correct thing to do! –  jk. Feb 16 '12 at 14:28
add comment

You can use Math.Round(), Math.Ceiling() or Math.Floor() depending on your needs.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Have a look at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms131274.aspx, you can use the Math.Round(Decimal, MidpointRounding) for this.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Take a look at the Math.Round() call that takes a MidpointRounding argument. With it, you can specify ToEven (rounded towards the nearest even number) or AwayFromZero (rounded to the nearest number in the direction away from zero) to alter the rounding behaviour.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.