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Is there a way that you can get a collection of all of the Models in your Rails app?

Basically, can I do the likes of: -

Models.each do |model|
  puts model.class.name
end

Thanks in advance.

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1  
If you need to collect all models including models of Rails engines/railties, see the answer by @jaime –  Andrei Feb 18 '11 at 11:21

21 Answers 21

up vote 62 down vote accepted

EDIT: Look at the comments and other answers. There are smarter answers than this one! Or try to improve this one as community wiki.

Models do not register themselves to a master object, so no, Rails does not have the list of models.

But you could still look in the content of the models directory of your application...

Dir.foreach("#{RAILS_ROOT}/app/models") do |model_path|
  # ...
end

EDIT: Another (wild) idea would be to use Ruby reflection to search for every classes that extends ActiveRecord::Base. Don't know how you can list all the classes though...

EDIT: Just for fun, I found a way to list all classes

Module.constants.select { |c| (eval c).is_a? Class }

EDIT: Finally succeeded in listing all models without looking at directories

Module.constants.select do |constant_name|
  constant = eval constant_name
  if not constant.nil? and constant.is_a? Class and constant.superclass == ActiveRecord::Base
    constant
  end
end

If you want to handle derived class too, then you will need to test the whole superclass chain. I did it by adding a method to the Class class:

class Class
  def extend?(klass)
    not superclass.nil? and ( superclass == klass or superclass.extend? klass )
  end
end

def models 
  Module.constants.select do |constant_name|
    constant = eval constant_name
    if not constant.nil? and constant.is_a? Class and constant.extend? ActiveRecord::Base
    constant
    end
  end
end
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3  
FYI, I timed both methods just for fun. Looking up the directories is an order of magnitude faster than searching though the classes. That was probably obvious, but now you know :) –  nilbus Jun 12 '10 at 14:25
6  
Also, it's important to note that searching for models via the constants methods will not include anything that hasn't been referenced since the app started, since it only loads the models on demand. –  nilbus Jun 12 '10 at 14:27
2  
I prefer 'Kernel.const_get constant_name' to 'eval constant_name'. –  Jeremy Weathers Nov 27 '10 at 18:48
3  
RAILS_ROOT is no longer available in Rails 3. Instead, use Dir.glob(Rails.root.join('app/models/*')) –  fanaugen May 16 '12 at 10:50
1  
Actually, the models do register themselves as descendants of ActiveRecord::Base now, so if you eager load all models then you can iterate them easily—see my answer below. –  sj26 Aug 20 '12 at 9:52

The whole answer for Rails 3 and 4 is:

If cache_classes is off (by default it's off in development, but on in production):

Rails.application.eager_load!

Then:

ActiveRecord::Base.descendants

This makes sure all models in your application, regardless of where they are, are loaded, and any gems you are using which provide models are also loaded.

If you'd like to know more about how this is done, check out ActiveSupport::DescendantsTracker.

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17  
Awesome! This should be the accepted answer. For anybody using this in a rake task: Make your task depend on :environment for the eager_load! to work. –  Jo Liss Aug 17 '12 at 21:06
1  
Or, as a slightly faster alternative to Rails.application.eager_load!, you can just load the models: Dir.glob(Rails.root.join('app/models/*')).each do |x| require x end –  Ajedi32 Aug 29 '12 at 18:54
3  
@Ajedi32 that is not complete, models can be defined outside those directories, especially when using engines with models. Slightly better, at least glob all Rails.paths["app/models"].existent directories. Eager loading the whole application is a more complete answer and will make sure there is absolutely nowhere left for models to be defined. –  sj26 Nov 30 '12 at 3:46
1  
I got what sj26 means but maybe there is a little mistake: as far as I know in development environment cache_classes is off (false) that's why you need to manually eager load the application to access all models. explained here –  masciugo Oct 17 '13 at 9:04
1  
@Ajedi32 again, not the complete answer. If you want to eager load only models then try: Rails.application.paths["app/models"].eager_load! –  sj26 Oct 29 '13 at 6:19

Just in case anyone stumbles on this one, I've got another solution, not relying on dir reading or extending the Class class...

ActiveRecord::Base.send :subclasses

This will return an array of classes. So you can then do

ActiveRecord::Base.send(:subclasses).map(&:name)
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5  
why don't you use ActiveRecord::Base.subclasses but have to use send? Also, it seems like you have to "touch" the model before it will show up, for example c = Category.new and it will show up. Otherwise, it won't. –  動靜能量 Sep 6 '10 at 15:12
43  
In Rails 3, this has been changed to ActiveRecord::Base.descendants –  Tobias Cohen Feb 16 '11 at 4:19
2  
You have to use "send" because the :subclasses member is protected. –  Kevin Rood Apr 1 '11 at 18:53
8  
Thanks for the Rails 3 tip. For anyone else who comes along, you still need to "touch" the models before ActiveRecord::Base.descendants will list them. –  nfm Jul 3 '11 at 1:18
3  
Technically in Rails 3 you have subclasses and descendants, they mean different things. –  sj26 May 17 '12 at 5:03

I looked for ways to do this and ended up choosing this way:

in the controller:
    @data_tables = ActiveRecord::Base.connection.tables

in the view:
  <% @data_tables.each do |dt|  %>
  <br>
  <%= dt %>
  <% end %>
  <br>

source: http://portfo.li/rails/348561-how-can-one-list-all-database-tables-from-one-project

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1  
This is the only way I can get ALL models, including models of Rails engines used in the app. Thanks for the tip! –  Andrei Feb 18 '11 at 11:18
2  
A few useful methods: ActiveRecord::Base.connection.tables.each{|t| begin puts "%s: %d" % [t.humanize, t.classify.constantize.count] rescue nil end} Some of the models may be not activated therefore you need to rescue it. –  Andrei Feb 18 '11 at 11:47
2  
Adapting @Andrei's a bit: model_classes = ActiveRecord::Base.connection.tables.collect{|t| t.classify.constantize rescue nil }.compact –  Max Williams Jun 17 '11 at 9:59
2  
This will not work for Single Table Inheritance. –  Joseph Jaber Nov 1 '11 at 21:51
ActiveRecord::Base.connection.tables.map do |model|
  model.capitalize.singularize.camelize
end

will return

["Article", "MenuItem", "Post", "ZebraStripePerson"] 
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5  
This will get you all the tables though, not just the models, since some tables don't always have associated models. –  courtsimas Mar 29 '12 at 21:25
1  
That's a great point; thanks. –  lightyrs Mar 30 '12 at 1:15

This seems to work for me:

  Dir.glob(RAILS_ROOT + '/app/models/*.rb').each { |file| require file }
  @models = Object.subclasses_of(ActiveRecord::Base)

Rails only loads models when they are used, so the Dir.glob line "requires" all the files in the models directory.

Once you have the models in an array, you can do what you were thinking (e.g. in view code):

<% @models.each do |v| %>
  <li><%= h v.to_s %></li>
<% end %>
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Thanks bhousel. I originally went with this style of approach but ended up using the solution that Vincent posted above as it meant that I didn't have to "Modelize" the file name as well (i.e. strip out any _, capitalize! each word and then join them again). –  mr_urf Feb 7 '09 at 14:03
    
with subdirectories: ...'/app/models/**/*.rb' –  artemave Mar 16 '11 at 10:30
    
Object.subclasses_of is deprecated after v2.3.8. –  David James Jul 25 '12 at 15:55

On one line: Dir['app/models/\*.rb'].map {|f| File.basename(f, '.*').camelize.constantize }

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5  
This one is nice since, in Rails 3, your models aren't auto-loaded by default, so many of the above methods won't return all possible models. My permutation also captures models in plugins and subdirectories: Dir['**/models/**/*.rb'].map {|f| File.basename(f, '.*').camelize.constantize } –  wbharding Feb 25 '11 at 19:12
1  
@wbharding That's pretty nice, but it errors out when it tries to constantize the names of my rspec model tests. ;-) –  Ajedi32 Aug 29 '12 at 19:11
    
@wbharding nice solution but it breaks when you have namespaced models –  Marcus Mansur Oct 4 '13 at 17:50

I think @hnovick's solution is a cool one if you dont have table-less models. This solution would work in development mode as well

My approach is subtly different though -

ActiveRecord::Base.connection.tables.map{|x|x.classify.safe_constantize}.compact

classify is well supposed to give you the name of the class from a string properly. safe_constantize ensures that you can turn it into a class safely without throwing an exception. This is needed in case you have database tables which are not models. compact so that any nils in the enumeration are removed.

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2  
That's awesome @Aditya Sanghi. I didn't know about safe_constantize. –  lightyrs Sep 18 '12 at 2:28

In just one line:

 ActiveRecord::Base.subclasses.map(&:name)
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2  
That doesn't show all the models for me. Not sure why. It's a couple short, in fact. –  courtsimas Apr 15 '13 at 23:20
1  
worked for me. 'just a little late to answer thats all. give it time. –  boulder_ruby Oct 17 '13 at 23:43

I can't comment yet, but I think sj26 answer should be the top answer. Just a hint:

Rails.application.eager_load! unless Rails.configuration.cache_classes
ActiveRecord::Base.descendants
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ActiveRecord::Base.connection.tables

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Also a nice followup is <table_name>.column_names to list all columns in the table. So for your user table you would execute User.column_names –  Lumbee Aug 13 '12 at 12:35
    
This will get you all the tables though, not just the models, since some tables don't always have associated models. –  courtsimas Apr 15 '13 at 23:20

If you want just the Class names:

ActiveRecord::Base.descendants.map {|f| puts f}

Just run it in Rails console, nothing more. Good luck!

EDIT: @sj26 is right, you need to run this first before you can call descendants:

Rails.application.eager_load!
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Just what I wanted. Thank! –  sunsations Jun 19 at 8:33
Module.constants.select { |c| (eval c).is_a?(Class) && (eval c) < ActiveRecord::Base }
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throws TypeError: no implicit conversion of Symbol into String in the console. –  snowangel Dec 16 '13 at 12:49

I'd like to comment sj26's answer, which is the one I prefer as I'm working in development environment, but I can't because of my young reputation. I got what he meant but maybe there is a little mistake: as far as I know in development environment cache_classes is off (false) that's why you need to manually eager load the application to access all models.

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To comment on something, add a comment, not an answer. –  Archonic Oct 17 '13 at 3:04
1  
you are right but, as explained, I wasn't eligeble to make comments. Now I am and so I did. thanks –  masciugo Oct 17 '13 at 9:06

Here's a solution that has been vetted with a complex Rails app (the one powering Square)

def all_models
  # must eager load all the classes...
  Dir.glob("#{RAILS_ROOT}/app/models/**/*.rb") do |model_path|
    begin
      require model_path
    rescue
      # ignore
    end
  end
  # simply return them
  ActiveRecord::Base.send(:subclasses)
end

It takes the best parts of the answers in this thread and combines them in the simplest and most thorough solution. This handle cases where your models are in subdirectories, use set_table_name etc.

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def load_models_in_development
  if Rails.env == "development"
    load_models_for(Rails.root)
    Rails.application.railties.engines.each do |r|
      load_models_for(r.root)
    end
  end
end

def load_models_for(root)
  Dir.glob("#{root}/app/models/**/*.rb") do |model_path|
    begin
      require model_path
    rescue
      # ignore
    end
  end
end
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Can you provide some explanation of the code as well..? –  NREZ Aug 22 '13 at 5:49

Just came across this one, as I need to print all models with their attributes(built on @Aditya Sanghi's comment):

ActiveRecord::Base.connection.tables.map{|x|x.classify.safe_constantize}.compact.each{ |model| print "\n\n"+model.name; model.new.attributes.each{|a,b| print "\n#{a}"}}
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This worked for me. Special thanks to all the posts above. This should return a collection of all your models.

models = []

Dir.glob("#{Rails.root}/app/models/**/*.rb") do |model_path|
  temp = model_path.split(/\/models\//)
  models.push temp.last.gsub(/\.rb$/, '').camelize.constantize rescue nil
end
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I've tried so many of these answers unsuccessfully in Rails 4 (wow they changed a thing or two for god sakes) I decided to add my own. The ones that called ActiveRecord::Base.connection and pulled the table names worked but didn't get the result I wanted because I've hidden some models (in a folder inside of app/models/) that I didn't want to delete:

def list_models
  Dir.glob("#{Rails.root}/app/models/*.rb").map{|x| x.split("/").last.split(".").first.camelize}
end

I put that in an initializer and can call it from anywhere. Prevents unnecessary mouse-usage.

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can check this

@models = ActiveRecord::Base.connection.tables.collect{|t| t.underscore.singularize.camelize}
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This works for Rails 3.2.18

Rails.application.eager_load!

def all_models
  models = Dir["#{Rails.root}/app/models/**/*.rb"].map do |m|
    m.chomp('.rb').camelize.split("::").last
  end
end
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