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I want to create a program that creates ".txt" files with random characters, but with the possibility of creating transposed "files". Next, I add an example of two ".txt" files as I intend to do.

FILE1

A|B|C|D|E|F|G|

H|I|J|K|L|M|N|

O|P|Q|R|S|T|U|

V|W|Z|1|2|3|4|

FILE2 (FILE1 transpossed)

A|H|O|V|

B|I|P|W|

C|J|Q|Z|

D|K|R|1|

E|L|S|2|

F|M|T|3|

G|N|U|4|

And now I add the code I have writen so that you can have a look and give me some ideas about how do it, what do modify and so on.

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<string>
#include<ctime>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int rows, columns, element1;

    char word[10];

    ofstream myfile ("File 1.txt");
    if(myfile)
        srand(1);
    for(rows=0;rows<10;rows++)
    {
        for(columns=0;columns<30;columns++)
        {
            element1 = rand() % 100000 + 1;
            int len = rand () % 4 + 4;
            word [len] = 0;
            while (len) word [--len] = 'A' + rand () % 58;

            myfile<<element1<<word;
            myfile<<"|";
        }
        myfile<<endl;

    }
    myfile.close();


    ofstream myfileS ("File 2.txt");
    if(myfileS)
        srand(1);
    for(columns=0;columns<30;columns++)
    {
        for(rows=0;rows<10;rows++)
        {

            element1 = rand() % 100000 + 1;
            int len = rand () % 4 + 4;
            word [len] = 0;
            while (len) word [--len] = 'A' + rand () % 58;

            myfileS<<element1<<word;
            myfileS<<"|";
        }
        myfileS<<endl;
    }
    myfile.close();



    system("pause");
    return 0;

}

Thanks for your help!

SOLUTION OF MY DOUBT

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<string>
#include<ctime>
#include<sstream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
int rows, columns, rowsMax, columnsMax; 
int element1;

    char word[10];

int a=0;

cout<<"Write the number of rows of your table: ";
cin>>rowsMax;

cout<<"Write the number of columns of your table: ";
cin>>columnsMax;

int answer;
cout<<"Do you want to create the transposed table??? (1 -> yes, 2 -> no): ";
cin>>answer;

string matriz[7][5]; // string matriz[rowsMax][columnsMax]; I should modify this in every query

string table ("Table1.txt");
ofstream myfile (table);
if(myfile.is_open())
srand(1);
myfile<<id<<"|"<<type<<"|"<<columnsMax<<endl;
for(rows=0;rows<rowsMax;rows++)
{
    for(columns=0;columns<columnsMax;columns++)
    {
        element1 = rand() % 100000 + 1;
        int len = rand () % 4 + 4;
        word [len] = 0;
        while (len) word [--len] = 'A' + rand () % 58;
        myfile<<element1<<word;
        myfile<<"|";

        std::stringstream ss;
            ss<<element1;

        string mat;
        mat +=ss.str();
        mat +=word;
        matriz[rows][columns]= mat;
    }
    myfile<<endl;

}
myfile.close();


while(answer==1)
{
    string table ("Table");
    table +=id;
    table +="(transposed)";
    table +=".txt";
    ofstream myfile (table);
    if(myfile.is_open())
    myfile<<id<<"|2|"<<columnsMax<<endl;
    for(int k=0;k<5;k++)
    {
            for(int j=0;j<7;j++)
        {
            myfile<<matriz[j][k]<<"|";
        }
            myfile<<endl;
    }
    answer=2;
}
system("pause");
return 0;

}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  • to create a transposed version of file1.txt, you'll have to keep its content in memory and visit that content in a transposed way.

  • when you write

    if(myfileS.is_open())
    srand(time(0));
    

    you just conditionalize the srand of the fact that the file is open or not. Not what follows. I'd put braces around everything.

  • the best way to test the status of an IOStream is just to use it as a condition

    if (myfileS)
    
share|improve this answer
    
I don't really catch the idea... could you please overwrite in my code what you mean??? Thanks AProgrammer! :) –  thomas Mar 2 '11 at 13:48
4  
No. You'll learn nothing if I do it. While you generate the first files, keep the written characters in memory. To generate the second file, use the characters you have memorized. –  AProgrammer Mar 2 '11 at 13:57
    
I have tried, but instead of getting what I indend, (though I keep the writen characters in memory), then I can't write then in a transposed way. The closes thing I get is the next one: I can get that the first line of the transposed file will be A|B|C|D| and not A|H|O|V| as I want. Any idea how could I do it???? –  thomas Mar 3 '11 at 10:11
    
@thomas: If you are still having difficulties, please update your question with your latest code (having memorised the randomly generated characters) and we will endeavour to assist. –  Johnsyweb Mar 28 '11 at 21:35
    
@Johnsyweb. Thanks for your interest and help, Johnsyweb! I already solvented this problem! :) Actually I've just uploaded the final code so that it is useful for another people. If you have any suggestion, feel free to give it back to me :) –  thomas Mar 29 '11 at 8:56

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