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My code is as follows :

for p in qs:
    set = None
    try:
        set = p.property.property_locations.all()
    except IndexError:
        pass

    if set:

Problem is that when set is none it still throws IndexError from this part of django.db.models.query:

try:
    qs = self._clone()
    qs.query.set_limits(k, k + 1)
    return list(qs)[0] 
except self.model.DoesNotExist, e:
    raise IndexError(e.args)

How to stop system from throwing this error and continuing to next element in for loop ?

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Does it work when you rename set to something different? set is a builtin function. –  Rudi Mar 2 '11 at 11:48
    
"when set is none"? You're setting set to None. It must always be None. What is your question, really? –  S.Lott Mar 2 '11 at 11:50
1  
What exactly is your problem? Assigning a QuerySet object to set will never raise an IndexError. Can you be a little bit more precise? –  Michal Chruszcz Mar 2 '11 at 12:11
    
turns out error was caused by some .pyc files not updating. –  moutone Mar 2 '11 at 12:27
3  
@moutone: Turns out that you should close the question. If the code has nothing to do with the actual problem (or the actual solution) it would be best to delete the question. –  S.Lott Mar 2 '11 at 14:01
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1 Answer

In any case, there are two mistakes in your code:

  1. set is a builtin (as you can see from SO's syntax highlighting), so by giving your variable that name you're shadowing the builtin for no purpose, which is at least bad practice, and likely to cause issues later in the code.
  2. The canonical way to check if set is not None is by writing: if set is not None

Better yet, the canonical way to write that code snippet is:

try:
    [code that might raise an exception]
except Error:
    [code that handles the exception]
else:
    [code that executes when no exception was raised]

(substitute Error for the actual exception, of course)

That way you don't even have to check 'set' at that point.

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