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I was reading a source code this morning when I came across a C# code sample that I don't understand:

public bool Dequeue(out T value)
{
    Node head;
    Node tail;
    Node next;

    while (true)
    {
        // read head
        head = this.head;
        tail = this.tail;
        next = head.Next;

        // Are head, tail, and next consistent?
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(this.head, head))
        {
           // Source code continues here...
        }
        // And here...
    }
}

The line I've got an issue with it the one which contains Object.ReferenceEquals().

If I understand well, the source code author wants to compare this.head and head but on the lines above, he just wrote head = this.head.

Coming mainly from a C++ background, this statement makes no sense to me. Moreover, under some circunstances, it seems that the Object.ReferenceEquals() line throws a System.NullReferenceException so it certainly does something, I just can't figure out what.

Can you help me understanding what this line does and possibly why ?

In case you need this, here is the Node class definition (I guess it is a "template" class, not sure of the wording for C#):

private class Node
{
    public T Value;
    public Node Next;

    public Node(T value)
    {
        this.Value = value;
    }
}

Thank you.

Edit: The rest of the method, for those who asked

    public void Enqueue(T value)
    {
        // Allocate a new node from the free list
        Node valueNode = new Node(value);

        while (true)
        {
            Node tail = this.tail;
            Node next = tail.Next;

            // are tail and next consistent
            if (Object.ReferenceEquals(tail, this.tail))
            {
                // was tail pointing to the last node?
                if (Object.ReferenceEquals(next, null))
                {
                    if (Object.ReferenceEquals(
                            Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref tail.Next, valueNode, next),
                            next
                            )
                        )
                    {
                        Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref this.tail, valueNode, tail);
                        break;
                    }
                }
                else // tail was not pointing to last node
                {
                    // try to swing Tail to the next node
                    Interlocked.CompareExchange<Node>(ref this.tail, next, tail);
                }
            }
        }
    }
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In which class is the Dequeue method located? –  Alex Bagnolini Mar 2 '11 at 13:22
    
Object.ReferenceEquals() shall never throw a NullReferenceException are you sure the exception occurs at that place? –  jdehaan Mar 2 '11 at 13:24
2  
Could you post the rest of the method? It might clear up things. In addition, do you know that this code works correctly? –  Ophir Yoktan Mar 2 '11 at 13:25
    
@Ophir Yoktan: Done. This code seems to work well since at least 9 months now. From some time however, the aforementioned line throws a NullReferenceException (my guess is network issues, we often have some) @jdehaan: Yes. Unless the stack trace is unreliable ? (Perhaps it can be, I don't know) –  ereOn Mar 2 '11 at 13:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

he just wrote head = this.head

Which is an assignment and has noting to do with comparing them. Note that this is about a field head and a local var this.head.

if (Object.ReferenceEquals(this.head, head))

Here the author wants to compare this.head and head while making sure the equality is based on their references (addresses), not on any (possible) overloading of == and Equals()

I assume that the local var head is being changed inside the loop, which makes it a disputable naming.

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I think the thrust of that statement is that if you've assigned one to equal the other, a ReferenceEquals call to check if their equal amounts to checking up on the compiler, or a poor-man's thread-safety tool. –  GWLlosa Mar 2 '11 at 13:24
    
I think the point he's missing is that this is a reference assignment in C#. To a C++ programmer Node head; head = this.head; would be a value assignment –  Rup Mar 2 '11 at 13:25
    
@Rup: I believe I understand very well the concept of reference (they also exist in C++, under a different form, yes, but still). What I'm missing is why would someone compare the references of two objects that should share the same reference because of the reference assignment. –  ereOn Mar 2 '11 at 13:31
    
Sure, I didn't mean that you didn't understand references just that here head is actually a reference (where it would need to have been Node* head in C++) and so reference comparison is valid this case. Sorry for misunderstanding. There's a slim chance it could be changed by head.Next if it were an accessor function not a member but otherwise I guess it's just paranoia. –  Rup Mar 2 '11 at 13:46
    
@Rup: It's all right, no offense taken :) –  ereOn Mar 2 '11 at 15:39

If this.head and this.tail is public, they can be changed while the loop is running. Object.ReferenceEquals checks if they are the same as when the method was executed.

It's hard to give a more complete answer without the whole class / context.

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this.head and this.tail are not public. The only public member is the method I gave and another one, very similar (named Enqueue). –  ereOn Mar 2 '11 at 13:40

ReferenceEquals is a function that is used to make sure that two instances of an object are the exact same object, rather than just two objects which have identical values. Documentation can be found here (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.object.referenceequals.aspx). As to the goal of that statement, if this code is executing in a multithreaded context, he could be trying to ensure that no one has messed with head since he did (very dangerous), or worried that someone passed in a value type (dangerous, but better ways to check).

EDIT: With the further code posted, it looks like the first thing. He's using ReferenceEquals to try to catch his race conditions when there are multiple threads (if it wasn't multi-threaded, he would not bother with InterlockedExchange). The code seems to be basically trying to perform an operation, and, if someone has changed horses on it in mid stream, simply trying again (while (true)). It'd probably be more elegant to use a critical section or a semaphore to ensure that nobody DOES modify your values, rather than simply hoping you can check if they have. The reason for that is that AFTER the IF, but BEFORE the InterlockedExchange, someone may modify your values, which introduces a bug.

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Looks like a linked list. Dequeue looks like a recursive function. So either "Next" does something with the "head" part of a node or it's running in parallel, and he is trying to check if stuff is still where it is, before proceeding. The last part is done incorrectly since you should be using a semaphore when entering a critical section, otherwise you are running into race conditions and it will fail sooner or later.

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The Interlocked.CompareExchange method is used to perform thread safe comparison and replacement - meaning this method should be able to handle cases where the queue is modified by external threads. The if statement is trying to handle cases where the list has been modified by other threads

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