Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I read that


int c;
while(c = getchar( ) != EOF)
{
   putchar(c);
}

will print the value 0 or 1 depending on whether the next character is an EOF or not. Because != has a higher precedence than = .

But when I run this program in gcc I get a character that looks like
|0 0|
|0 1|

as output when I press enter.

share|improve this question
    
My understanding is that since the inequality checking happens first the variable c should get the value 0 which is equivalent to false. –  John Mar 2 '11 at 13:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

putchar prints a character. By printing the values 0 and 1, you're printing the null and start of heading (SOH) characters, both control characters. You'll need to convert the numbers 0 and 1 to something that's printable, either by calculating a printable value directly from the 0 or 1:

while (...) {
    // note: the C standard (§ 5.2.1-3 of C99) ensures '0'+1 is '1', which is printable
    putchar(c+'0');
}

or using c to decide what to print.

while (...) {
    if (c) {
        ...
    } else {
        ...
    }
    // or:
    //putchar(c ? ... : ...);
    // though feelings on the ternary operator vary.
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You can turn that into a macro for readability: #define BOOL_TO_ASCII(c) ((c) ? '1' : '0') –  uʍop ǝpısdn Mar 2 '11 at 14:07
    
'0' + 1 is '1'. The C Standard mandates all digits be sequential from '0' to '9'. There is no such guarantee for letters. –  pmg Mar 2 '11 at 14:09
    
@pmg: I was not aware of that. Good to know. –  outis Mar 2 '11 at 14:12
    
@Santiago: feelings on macros vary, too. –  outis Mar 2 '11 at 14:12
1  
Character values are numbers, both in C ('char' is an integer type large enough to store the members of the basic character set) and in ASCII (which associates numeric code points and characters). What distinguishes chars from other numeric types in C is that chars have special display semantics. Also, the encoding doesn't need to be ASCII; it's whatever the platform uses (putchar simply writes the character to a stream, unconcerned with what the stream does with it). –  outis Mar 3 '11 at 4:48

This is what happens in your program

int c;

reserve space for an int (call that space c) and don't worry about its contents.

while(c = getchar( ) != EOF)

The thing in parenthesis can be written as c = (getchar( ) != EOF) because the assignment operator has lower precedence than the inequality operator.

  • getchar() waits for a keypress and returns the value of the key pressed
  • That value is checked against EOF
  • As it's different, the result of the inequality operator is 1
  • and the value 1 gets put in the space with name c.

Then, inside the while loop

{
   putchar(c);
}

you're printing the character with value 1. As you've noticed, on your computer, the character with value 1 does not have a beautiful format when displayed :)


If you really want to print the values 0 or 1 with beautiful formats, try this

c = 0; /* or 1 */
putchar('0' + c);

If you want to print a value between 0 and 9 as a character, try this

c = 5; /* or 7, or 0, ... */
putchar('0' + c);
share|improve this answer
    
In C False is 0 but here it's printing 1. ???? –  John Mar 3 '11 at 3:58
    
getchar() returns EOF only rarely. When it returns regular values they are different and the condition ( getchar() != EOF ) is true. –  pmg Mar 3 '11 at 7:56
    
oh... yes my mistake. It's true. –  John Mar 3 '11 at 10:51
    
I'm running the program in terminal. So ctrl+C is the way to send EOF, right? But my program also quits. So how do we print the last false value. –  John Mar 3 '11 at 10:52
1  
@John: you send EOF with Ctrl+D in *nix or Ctrl+Z in windows. Ctrl+C send a "quit" signal in both environments: no wonder the program quits :) –  pmg Mar 3 '11 at 10:56

In addition to what everyone said about c being a nonprintable character, you would never print out a 0 for EOF anyway, since you're not going to go into the while loop in that case. You would need an extra putchar after the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
yes. But that's where the problem is. I'm running the program in a terminal (in Ubuntu). Pressing Ctrl+C is the only way to send the EOF value. But immediately the program quits so how do i print it?? –  John Mar 3 '11 at 4:00
    
See this answer for more info stackoverflow.com/questions/1793616/… –  irritate Mar 3 '11 at 12:35

You are using a unicode-console. All non-printable characters (like the bytes with value 0 and 1) are converted to the 2x2-matrix displaying its unicode-value. (Also, for all printable characters for which you have no font installed)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.