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Can someone give me 1 good reason why in C# the chained constructor is always called before any of the constructor body?

.NET allows you to call the chained constructor at any point within the constructor, so why does C# force you to do it before your constructor body executes?

I once wrote to Anders H and asked him this and he was kind enough to spend the time replying despite how busy he must be. Unfortunately he managed to answer a question I didn't actually ask (about named constructors.)

So, just out of curiosity I thought I would ask here because personally I don't think there is a single good reason for this limitation, so hopefully I will be reeducated :-)

Just to clarify. The .NET CLR rule is that 1 constructor must be called, only 1 constructor, and only once. So in the CLR these are valid

public class Meh
{
  public Meh()
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Meh()");
    this("Hello");
  }

  public Meh(string message)
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Meh {0}", message);
    base();
  }
}

But not in C#

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Most answers so far assume you're talking about calling the base class constructors. However, I think you're talking about calling other constructors for the current class like this(some, other, args); Which is it? –  Outlaw Programmer Feb 5 '09 at 17:51

6 Answers 6

Making the chained constructor execute first guarantees that all base class elements are at least as available in the derived class as they are in the base. Allowing the chained constructor to be executed at an arbitrary point would be a trade-off with little discernible benefit.

Allowing an arbitrary entry point for the chained constructor also precludes lazy creation of the base class since such a feature would potentially run the chained constructor twice.

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"execute first..base class elements..as available in..derived..as in the base." So does calling it any point before you access them. "Precludes lazy creation" I have no idea what you mean :-) "Run constructor twice" The compiler could prevent this, and the CLR would throw an exception anyway. –  Peter Morris Feb 5 '09 at 17:29
    
"Calling at any point before you access them" is synonymous with "lazy creation." If you leave it up to the compiler to call the base constructor when you access an element defined it the base, you can't pin the run point of that same constructor in code. –  Yes - that Jake. Feb 5 '09 at 19:15

/* Since you can do below commented code as in delphi public class BaseClass { public BaseClass(string sSql) { ExecSQL(sSql); //execute query } }

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public DerivedClass(int i, DateTime dt)
    {
        string sSql = "";
        //construct sSql based on i, dt
        base(sSql);
        //do something else
    }
}      

*/

//follow the below code to handle base construtor code. public class BaseClass { public BaseClass() { //do nothing }

    public BaseClass(string sSql)
    {
        ExecSQL(sSql);
        //DO NOT do anything else
    }    

    public BaseClass(int i, DateTime dt)
    {
        //in base class ignore the parameters.
        string sWhereClause = "";
        string sSql = setSQL(sWhereClause);
        ExecSQL(sWhereClause);
        //DO NOT do anything else
    }

   protected virtual string setSQL(string value)
   {
       //set the sql
       string sSql = "";
       //add value into sSql
       return sSql;
   }

   protected virtual void ExecSQL(string sSql)
   {
       int i = 1;
       //execute query            
   }
}

public class DerivedClass: BaseClass 
{
    //public DerivedClass(string sSql):base (sSql){}
    public DerivedClass()
    {
        //do nothing
    }

    public DerivedClass(string sSql)
    {
        ExecSQL(sSql);
       //DO NOT do anything else
    }

    public DerivedClass(int i, DateTime dt)
    {
        ExecSQL(i, dt);
        //do something else after base execution
    }

   protected void ExecSQL(int i, DateTime dt) //overloaded procedure
   {
       string sWhereClause = "";
       //construct wherclause based on i, dt
       string sSql = setSQL(sWhereClause); //calls baseclass function
       base.ExecSQL(sWhereClause); //calls baseclass procedure
   }       
}

DerivedClass mdD = new DerivedClass(2, DateTime.Now); BaseClass mdB = new BaseClass("sql");

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Since you say "subjective" I suppose you're not asking for the historical reason; so:

  1. This is how C++ does it.
  2. Why would you not want the base class to be constructed?
  3. It is worth making the language more complicated to accomodate whatever rare use-case you mentioned as an answer to '2.'?
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To be honest, I doubt (1) was considered - Mr. Heljsberg and his team are known to not have designed the language with this sort of "backwards compatability" in mind. –  Tamas Czinege Feb 5 '09 at 17:32
    
That's as may be. But, C++ has [good] reasons for doing it the way it does, which the OP presumably already knows ... because C# is doing the same as C++, I suggest that these same good reasons apply to C# too. –  ChrisW Feb 5 '09 at 17:43
    
I don't know C++ at all so I don't know the good reasons, but those reasons don't exist in the CLR because other .NET languages permit it. –  Peter Morris Feb 5 '09 at 18:59

So it is consistent with base constructors. Base constructors get called before your constructor when you reference them with : base() so it makes sense that: this() has the same semantics.

Also there isn't really a sensible use case to make it work the other way round.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

If there were a genuine reason why this ability should not be provided then it wouldn't be supported by the CLR or other .NET languages. I can only conclude that the answer is one of those "Because it's always been this way" ones, and the restriction was probably just copied from C++ or something.

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It's a problem when the parameters you're passing the base constructor need validation-checking. This shouldn't be done in the base constructor, and can't be done in the derived class.

(I'm assuming here that one isn't going to have a parameterless-constructor that does nothing. I can't have that in my situation, as it's a requirement that there shouldn't be one.)

I can't see an elegant solution to this.

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