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My company has a product that will I feel can benefit from a web service API. We are using MSMQ to route messages back and forth through the backend system. Currently we are building an ASP.Net application that communicates with a web service (WCF) that, in turn, talks to MSMQ for us. Later on down the road, we may have other client applications (not necessarily written in .Net). The message going into MSMQ is an object that has a property made up of an array of strings. There is also a property that contains the command (a string) that will be routed through the system. Personally, I am not a huge fan of this, but I was told it is for scalability and every system can use strings.

My thought, regarding the web services was to model some objects based on our data that can be passed into and out of the web services so they are easily consumed by the client. Initially, I was passing the message object, mentioned above, with the array of strings in it. I was finding that I was creating objects on the client to represent that data, making the client responsible for creating those objects. I feel the web service layer should really be handling this. That is how I have always worked with services. I did this so it was easier for me to move data around the client.

It was recommended to our group we should maintain the “single entry point” into the system by offering an object that contains commands and have one web service to take care of everything. So, the web service would have one method in it, Let’s call it MakeRequest and it would return an object (either serialized XML or JSON). The suggestion was to have a base object that may contain some sort of list of commands that other objects can inherit from. Any other object may have its own command structure, but still inherit base commands. What is passed back from the service is not clear right now, but it could be that “message object” with an object attached to it representing the data. I don’t know.

My recommendation was to model our objects after our actual data and create services for the types of data we are working with. We would create a base service interface that would house any common methods used for all services. So for example, GetById, GetByName, GetAll, Save, etc. Anything specific to a given service would be implemented for that specific implementation. So a User service may have a method GetUserByUsernameAndPassword, but since it implements the base interface it would also contain the “base” methods. We would have several methods in a service that would return the type of object expected, based on the service being called. We could house everything in one service, but I still would like to get something back that is more usable. I feel this approach leaves the client out of making decisions about what commands to be passed. When I connect to a User service and call the method GetById(int id) I would expect to get back a User object.

I had the luxury of working with MS when I started developing WCF services. So, I have a good foundation and understanding of the technology, but I am not the one designing it this time. So, I am not opposed to the “single entry point” idea, but any thoughts about why either approach is more scalable than the other would be appreciated. I have never worked with such a systematic approach to a service layer before. Maybe I need to get over that?

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I think this is the longest question ever ;-) –  Acentric Mar 2 '11 at 14:15
    
I know ;) I am pretty long winded at times, but I like to give as much information as possible. You should see some of my emails. you can hear the sighs over the internet when they are received ;) –  DDiVita Mar 2 '11 at 14:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think there are merits to both approaches.

Typically, if you are writing an API that is going to be consumed by a completely separate group of developers (perhaps in another company), then you want the API to be as self-explanative and discoverable as possible. Having specific web service methods that return specific objects is much easier to work with from the consumer's perspective.

However, many companies use web services as one of many layers to their applications. In this case, it may reduce maintenance to have a generic API. I've seen some clever mechanisms that require no changes whatsoever to the service in order to add another column to a table that is returned from the database.

My personal preference is for the specific API. I think that the specific methods are much easier to work with - and are largely self-documenting. The specific operation needs to be executed at some point, so why not expose it for what it is? You'd get laughed at if you wrote:

public void MyApiMethod(string operationToPerform, params object[] args)
{
    switch(operationToPerform)
    {
        case "InsertCustomer":
            InsertCustomer(args);
            break;
        case "UpdateCustomer":
            UpdateCustomer(args);
            break;
        ...
        case "Juggle5BallsAtOnce":
            Juggle5BallsAtOnce(args);
            break;
    }
}

So why do that with a Web Service? It'd be much better to have:

public void InsertCustomer(Customer customer)
{
    ...
}

public void UpdateCustomer(Customer customer)
{
    ...
}

...

public void Juggle5BallsAtOnce(bool useApplesAndEatThemConcurrently)
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Kind of my point to the question. Since any new command needs to be updated in the service, anyway, why not have specific methods? –  DDiVita Mar 2 '11 at 14:22
    
@DDiVita - exactly. The only implementation I can think of that would require no code changes to the service for a new command, would be a service that took SQL as a parameter, executed it and returned the results as a DataSet. But that would be wrong on so many levels! ;-) –  Acentric Mar 2 '11 at 14:28
    
Agreed there! I doubt the DBAs would like that idea ;) –  DDiVita Mar 2 '11 at 14:34

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