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Could you please help me optimize this query. I've spent lots of time and still cannot rephrase it to be fast enough (say running in the matters of seconds, not minutes as it is now).

The query:

SELECT m.my_id, m.my_value, m.my_timestamp
  FROM (
    SELECT my_id, MAX(my_timestamp) AS most_recent_timestamp
      FROM my_table
      WHERE my_timestamp < '2011-03-01 08:00:00'
      GROUP BY my_id
  ) as tmp
LEFT OUTER JOIN my_table m
ON tmp.my_id = m.my_id AND tmp.most_recent_timestamp = m.my_timestamp
ORDER BY m.my_timestamp;

my_table is defined as follows:

CREATE TABLE my_table (
   my_id INTEGER NOT NULL,
   my_value VARCHAR(4000),
   my_timestamp TIMESTAMP default CURRENT_TIMESTAMP NOT NULL,
   INDEX MY_ID_IDX (my_id),
   INDEX MY_TIMESTAMP_IDX (my_timestamp),
   INDEX MY_ID_MY_TIMESTAMP_IDX (my_id, my_timestamp)
);

The goal of this query is to select the most recent my_value for each my_idbefore some timestamp. my_table contains ~100 million entries and it takes ~8 minutes to perform it.

explain:

+----+-------------+-------------+-------+------------------------------------------------+-------------------------+---------+---------------------------+-------+---------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table       | type  | possible_keys                                  | key                     | key_len | ref                       | rows  | Extra                                 |
+----+-------------+-------------+-------+------------------------------------------------+-------------------------+---------+---------------------------+-------+---------------------------------------+
|  1 | PRIMARY     | <derived2>  | ALL   | NULL                                           | NULL                    | NULL    | NULL                      | 90721 | Using temporary; Using filesort       |
|  1 | PRIMARY     | m          | ref   | MY_ID_IDX,MY_TIMESTAMP_IDX,MY_ID_TIMESTAMP_IDX | MY_TIMESTAMP_IDX        | 4       | tmp.most_recent_timestamp |    1  | Using where                           |
|  2 | DERIVED     | my_table    | range | MY_TIMESTAMP_IDX                               | MY_ID_MY_TIMESTAMP_IDX  | 8       | NULL                      | 61337 | Using where; Using index for group-by |
+----+-------------+-------------+-------+------------------------------------------------+-----------------------+---------+---------------------------+------+---------------------------------------+
share|improve this question
2  
Are you sure that's the query plan for the query you posted? The plan mentions table nv, but there's no such table in the query. The query may not even be correct, as the value for my_id in the sub-select may not be (indeed isn't likely to be) the id for the row where my_timestamp = MAX(my_timestamp). –  outis Mar 2 '11 at 14:26
    
Which version of mysql? and why table name of 1 is deleted. –  Zimbabao Mar 2 '11 at 14:27
    
Shouldn't your join condition be ...AND tmp.most_recent_timestamp = m.my_timestamp...? The inner query also looks to be missing a GROUP BY. –  Joe Stefanelli Mar 2 '11 at 14:32
    
Can you explain what "SELECT my_id, MAX(my_timestamp) AS .." does and why no group by? –  Zimbabao Mar 2 '11 at 14:33
    
@outis, I'm sorry. I've modified original explain from the production DB and there might be inconsitencies. I've tried to correct them.| @Joe Stefanelli, yes it does. Seems that I've missed it while preparing and SCCE. @Zimbabao, mysql version 5.1. –  Alex Nikolaenkov Mar 2 '11 at 14:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I notice in the explain plan that the optimizer is using the MY_ID_MY_TIMESTAMP_IDX index for the sub-query, but not the outer query.

You may be able to speed it up using an index hint. I also updated the ON clause to refer to tmp.most_recent_timestamp using its alias.

SELECT m.my_id, m.my_value, m.my_timestamp
  FROM (
    SELECT my_id, MAX(my_timestamp) AS most_recent_timestamp
      FROM my_table
      WHERE my_timestamp < '2011-03-01 08:00:00'
      GROUP BY my_id
  ) as tmp
LEFT OUTER JOIN my_table m use index (MY_ID_MY_TIMESTAMP_IDX)
ON tmp.my_id = m.my_id AND tmp.most_recent_timestamp = m.my_timestamp
ORDER BY m.my_timestamp;
share|improve this answer
    
@Ike, I've corrected the query. Missed the group by statement while preparing an SCCE. The problem is that I have to fetch the "most recent timestamps" for every my_id. –  Alex Nikolaenkov Mar 2 '11 at 14:55
    
Gotcha. I'll update my answer to reflect that. –  Ike Walker Mar 2 '11 at 16:08
    
@Ike, unfortunately I've tried that myself but that doesn't change optimizers behaviour. As far as I understood it's a MySQL feature (mysqlperformanceblog.com/2006/08/31/…). And at this point I think that it's still possible to tune the query without creating temporary tables or views. –  Alex Nikolaenkov Mar 3 '11 at 14:57
    
@Alex, If USE INDEX doesn't help, try FORCE INDEX instead. You should be able to force it to use MY_ID_MY_TIMESTAMP_IDX for table m, which could speed up your query a lot. –  Ike Walker Mar 3 '11 at 15:21
    
@Ike, unfortunately FORCE INDEX wont change anything. As far as I understand MySQL creates temporary table and joins using it. And that table has no indices. I've tried a lot of things and it seems that the problem should be apporached from the another perspective because even if I manage to speed up this query on a table with 40 million rows it will still took ages on the table with 400 mil rows (just tested on such table). I'm accepting your answer not because it solved my problem but because it helped me the most. Thank you for your time. –  Alex Nikolaenkov Mar 5 '11 at 16:55

If I understand correctly, you should be able to drop the nested select completely, and move the where clause to the main query, order by my_timestamp descending and limit 1.

SELECT my_id, my_value, max(my_timestamp)
FROM my_table
WHERE my_timestamp < '2011-03-01 08:00:00'
GROUP BY my_id

*edit - added max and group by

share|improve this answer
    
Change the ORDER BY to DESC and this is perfect. –  Ike Walker Mar 2 '11 at 14:38
    
The only problem is that we need most recent entries for all the my_ids. I think that this query produces only one result. –  Alex Nikolaenkov Mar 2 '11 at 14:51
    
@Alex: how many results do you want? –  Ike Walker Mar 2 '11 at 14:57
    
@Ike, for each my_id i want to select the most recent value. So I need count(distinct my_id) results. –  Alex Nikolaenkov Mar 2 '11 at 15:00
    
try adding max(my_timestamp) in the select and group by my_id and remove the limit –  sreimer Mar 2 '11 at 15:26

a trick to get a most recent record can be to use order by together with 'limit 1' instead of max aggregation together with "self" join

somthing like this (not tested):

SELECT m.my_id, m.my_value, m.my_timestamp
FROM my_table m
WHERE my_timestamp < '2011-03-01 08:00:00'
ORDER BY m.my_timestamp DESC
LIMIT 1
;

update above doesn't work because a grouping is required...
other solution that has WHERE-IN-SubSelect instead of the JOIN you've used.
could be faster. please test with your data.

SELECT m.my_id, m.my_value, m.my_timestamp
FROM my_table m
WHERE ( m.my_id, m.my_timestamp ) IN (
  SELECT i.my_id, MAX(i.my_timestamp)
  FROM my_table i
  WHERE i.my_timestamp < '2011-03-01 08:00:00'
  GROUP BY i.my_id
  )
ORDER BY m.my_timestamp;
share|improve this answer
    
we need all most recent pairs of (id, value) not only the most recent one. –  Alex Nikolaenkov Mar 2 '11 at 14:53
    
The las one is not optimization but actually degrades performance. According to: mysqlperformanceblog.com/2010/10/25/… –  Alex Nikolaenkov Mar 5 '11 at 16:51

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