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In our .net application we need to load some data (key/value pairs) from the database and use it through out the application. We don't want to hit the database for each request (key) to get the value again and again. I would like to know what is the standard and effecient approach on this?

Thanks to all for the responses till now.. and I think, in my case (data is not very large), I will load the data in some static keyvaluepair and use it when needed. I want this to be added to the business layer, here is my over simplified structure, in the base class I have added a static constructor and defiend the keyvaluepair:

class BaseClass
{
   //declare static keyvaluepair (kvp)
   static BaseClass()
   {
       //load kvp from database
   }
   public void print(string key)
   {
       //use kvp to get the value for the key
   }
}
class ChildA : BaseClass
{
   public void somethingA()
   {
      //call print(key)
   }
}
class ChildB : BaseClass
{
   public void somethingB()
   {
      //call print(key)
   }}

class main
{
   public void GetChildA()
   { 
       ChildA a = new ChildA();
       a.somethingA();
   }

   public void GetChildB()
   { 
       ChildB b = new ChildB();
       b.somethingB();
   }
}

From the frontend I call the method from the Main class. I want to make sure that when I call a.somethingA() or b.somethingB(), the kvp should only be loaded once initially. And the subsequent calls should just get the data from the memory. Does above approach seems correct or I have messed it up?

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3 Answers 3

Load all data of your table (if it is not too large) in a Hashtable at program start.

Then your application can access the key-value-pairs very fast from your global/static Hashtable variable.

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the data is really small, I am going with static keyvaluepair. –  kuul13 Mar 2 '11 at 16:13
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2 approaches come in naturally

  1. single request per key (slow)
  2. load up whole keyvalue pair table (slow initial load, fast further requests, big memory use if table is big)
  3. is something in between those 2

you can preload popular key value pairs, and check whether they are loaded first in local memory before making real call to db. If you can't figure out whats popular you can introduce some criteria to figure it out, and preload only keyvaluepairs with hit count > some constant . 3rd approach might be best when table is big but you need to find a way to preload most popular pairs which sounds like a pretty hard task.

Of-course you need to save recently requested pairs in memory so you dont make continious sql calls for same value pairs, even if you implement first strategy.

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thanks valentin for the descriptive solution. appreciate if you can check my sample code above to confirm if the approach is correct? –  kuul13 Mar 2 '11 at 16:12
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It depends on the size of the collection really. If it is a relatively smaller collection you might want to load this on the application start and read it from there. However if it is a larger collection or only some keys are read on a normal usage pattern then it would be helpful to write your own in memory container which knows how to query the DB to get a key. You could then do something like

NodeCollection<T>["keyofitem"]

The NodeCollection class will maintain an internal key/value collection which will be queried for the "keyofitem" passed, if it exists it is returned, if not then a DB lookup happens, the value is fetched, is added to the internal collection and returned to the caller.

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Thanks Nikhil, my collection is relatively small. I have added the sample code to confirm if the approach is correct? –  kuul13 Mar 2 '11 at 16:11
    
You don't really need inheritance here. Make BaseClass static and the method print as static too. Then you can simply do BaseClass.Print(key). This is very over simplified. I would probably put in some locking mechanism in the static constructor of BaseClass as well! –  Nikhil Mar 2 '11 at 16:39
    
If I make the BaseClass as static, then in my code above, how and when will the keyvaluepair be populated? Will it be populated everytime I call BaseClass.Print(key)? –  kuul13 Mar 3 '11 at 16:21
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