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I have some jQuery code that looks like this:

$('.mainNav2 > li').mouseleave(function(){
    var someNum = Math.random();
    $(this).attr('id', someNum);
    var t = setTimeout("HideMenu(someNum)", 200);
    $('li.clicked').mouseenter(function() {
        clearTimeout(t);
    });
});

function HideMenu(id) {
    $('#'+id).removeClass('clicked');
}

It's purpose is to hide a mega menu on mouse leave, but also takes into account accidental mouse leaves, by using a 300 millisecond setTimeout. If the user brings the mouse pointer back into the li within 300 milliseconds, the menu is not hidden because clearTimout(t) is called.

The problem is when the user DOES intent to mouseout, the function in the setTimout is not being called. According to this page: http://www.w3schools.com/js/js_timing.asp my syntax is correct, but I can only get the HideMenu function called from the setTimeout if I write it like this:

var t = setTimeout(HideMenu, 300);

Why isn't it working as written, where I can pass a variable into the function as a parameter?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

While the marked correct answer is one method of achieving this... I don't believe it is the correct.

See the attached JS Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/PWHw3/

What we are doing here basically is:

setTimeout(function, timeout, param);

Example:

var test = function(a){
    var b = (a) ? a : "fail";
    alert(b);
};
setTimeout(test, 500, "works");

This works for me, and eliminates the needs to pass through two functions.

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4  
Be aware that passing parameters to setTimeout() and setInterval() is not a cross-browser solution (namely, it fails in Internet Explorer). –  user113215 Mar 15 '13 at 16:12
    
@user113215 I can't speak for earlier browsers but I can verify that it works in IE11. –  MiniRagnarok Apr 24 at 16:35

To make it work, and do it without using the nasty eval version of setTimeout change:

var t = setTimeout("HideMenu(someNum)", 200);

to this:

var t = setTimeout(function(s) {  
                 return function() { HideMenu(s) } }(someNum), 200);

This way you pass the value of someNum into the variable s in the scope of the setTimeout.

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-1 You should never pass a string to setTimeout. –  nyuszika7h Mar 2 '11 at 14:45
1  
@ Nyuszika7H: Try to actually read my answer, and you might find that i recommend not doing it, and that my solution doesn't do it –  Martin Jespersen Mar 2 '11 at 14:47
    
@Martin Oh, right. +1 –  nyuszika7h Mar 2 '11 at 14:48
    
Why the double function? You already have a closure with just the one. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 2 '11 at 14:49
    
@Thomas: because setTimeout needs a function reference. The outer function is immediate and returns a function reference for use by setTimeout. The returned function reference has the variable s in it's scope so it is available when the setTimeout triggers. –  Martin Jespersen Mar 2 '11 at 14:52

setTimeout accepts a function and a millisecond delay. The function can be either a function reference or a string that will get evaluated when the timeout fires. Your current sequence looks like this:

  • mouseleave function

    • assign variable someNum a value. someNum is scoped to the current function
    • set a timer to evaluate the string "HideNum(someNum)" after 200ms.
    • end function, leave function scope
  • 200ms passes

  • "HideNum(someNum)" is evaluated. It should throw an exception as the variable someNum is undefined. That's why HideNum is not being called - check for errors in your console.

What you want is a function reference, which will keep your someNum in scope (via closure - which you might want to read up on).

setTimeout(function() { 
  HideNum(someNum); 
}, 200);

You'll find the Mozilla docs a better reference for JavaScript. Here's the window.setTimeout docs.

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What you want to do is to create an anonymous function and call that in the setTimeout call.

setTimeout(function() { HideMenu(someNum) }, 200);

If I correctly understand what you want to do, though, you shouldn't have to bother with setting an id and all that stuff. Something like this should do it:

$('.mainNav2 > li').mouseleave(function() {
  var $this = $(this);
  var t = setTimeout(function() {
    $this.removeClass('clicked');
  }, 200);
  $('li.clicked').mouseenter(function() {
    clearTimeout(t);
  });
});
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There's some more complicated reasons why I need the ID. I'll give the anonymous function a try. But why didn't the original work? Is w3schools.com wrong in their examples where they put the function and the parameter in quotes? –  Ben Mar 2 '11 at 14:47
    
@Ben Avoid w3schools.com. Find out why, at w3fools.com (made by the jQuery team). Passing a string to setTimeout opens up your code to XSS and other security risks. –  nyuszika7h Mar 2 '11 at 14:50
    
What @Nyuszika7H said. If you would pass a string, I think you would need to evaluate the parameter first, i.e. setTimeout("HideMenu(" + someNum + ")" ... But you really don't want to do that. –  Linus G Thiel Mar 3 '11 at 17:48

There are more ways to do that.

1. Use an anonymous function (recommended)

setTimeout(function() {
    hideMenu('someNum');
}, 200);

2. setTimeout and setInterval have a hidden feature: you can specify parameters after the timeout.

setTimeout(hideMenu, 200, params);

Since you're already using jQuery, you shouldn't make a separate function, but extend jQuery's prototype instead, like this:

jQuery.fn.hideMenu = function() {
    this.removeClass('clicked');
    return this;
};

Usage:

$('#num').hideMenu();

Notice that you don't need to pass this to jQuery when you're extending its prototype, because it's already passed to jQuery. And return this; is required to keep the ability of chaining.

If you choose this way, you need to use an anonymous functions, there's no easier way.


Update

There's already a plugin for that: jQuery.hoverIntent(). No need to make it yourself. It's easy to use, just replace mouseleave event with this:

$('#someNum').hoverIntent(jQuery.noop, function() {
    // your function goes here
});

It's important to do it this way, since the first one is the mouseenter handler, and the second is the mouseleave handler. jQuery.noop is an empty function, it's effectively the same as function() {}.

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@ Nyuszika7H - What's with the 300 number? Is that your representation of my someNum var? –  Ben Mar 2 '11 at 14:56
    
@Ben Yep, but I changed it to 'someNum' in my examples. –  nyuszika7h Mar 2 '11 at 15:02

Because you're writing a string, which isn't as intelligent as an actual closure.

$('.mainNav2 > li').mouseleave(function(){
    var someNum = Math.random();
    $(this).attr('id', someNum);
    var t = setTimeout(function() { HideMenu(someNum); }, 200);
    $('li.clicked').mouseenter(function() {
        clearTimeout(t);
    });
});

function HideMenu(id) {
    $('#'+id).removeClass('clicked');
}
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