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I'm begginer of Python. I want to understand arguments of __init__.

class Num:
    def __init__(self,num):
        self.n = num
    def getn(self):
        return self.n
    def getone():
        return 1
myObj = Num(3)

print myObj.getn()

RESULT: 3

This is OK.But I call getone() method,

print myObj.getone()

RESULT: Error 'getone()' takes no arguments (1given).

So I replace

def getone():
    return 1

with

def getone(self):
    return 1

RESULT:1 This is OK.

But getone() method needs no arguments.

Do I have to use meaningless argument?

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4  
they are not meaningless. every method of a class always have one implicit argument, the instance. In C++ it's the same, but you never see it in the argument list because it magically appears out of the bushes of the fairy forest. Python is Explicit is better than implicit. –  Stefano Borini Mar 2 '11 at 15:01
1  
You can use @staticmethod and @classmethod decorators to do what you want. Please see the example in my answer. –  Mike Steder Mar 2 '11 at 15:13
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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Python instance methods require the self argument. Class methods take the class as a first argument. Static methods allow you to have no self/cls argument.

__init__ is a special function and without overriding __new__ it will always be given the instance of the class as its first argument.

An example using the builtin classmethod and staticmethod decorators:

import sys

class Num:
    max = sys.maxint

    def __init__(self,num):
        self.n = num

    def getn(self):
        return self.n

    @staticmethod
    def getone():
        return 1

    @classmethod
    def getmax(cls):
        return cls.max

myObj = Num(3)
# with the appropriate decorator these should work fine
myObj.getone()
myObj.getmax()
myObj.getn()

That said, I would try to use @classmethod/@staticmethod sparingly. If you find yourself creating objects that consist of nothing but staticmethods the more pythonic thing to do would be to create a new module of related functions.

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Every method needs to accept one argument: The instance itself (or the class if it is a static method).

Read more about classes in Python.

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The fact that your method does not use the self argument (which is a reference to the instance that the method is attached to) doesn't mean you can leave it out. It always has to be there, because Python is always going to try to pass it in.

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In python you must always pass in at least one argument to class methods, the argument is self and it is not meaningless its a reference to the instance itself

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The current object is explicitly passed to the method as the first parameter. self is the conventional name. You can call it anything you want but it is strongly advised that you stick with this convention to avoid confusion.

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