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I have 3 tables in my database. Each of them has one column, "index" that links the fields across all 3.

Our starting point is table a, and the indexes inside it. If the index is not there, I don't need it.

Tables b and c are very similar, and every index listed in table a will be in b or c, or both. All I need to do is make sure that all the fields in table a are joined to fields in table b or c.

I started with:

SELECT * 
FROM `table_a` 
JOIN table_b ON table_a.index = table_b.index

Which works great. But it will exclude all the indexes in table a which don't match, which is why I believe, when I add:

UNION
FROM `table_a` 
JOIN table_c ON table_a.index = table_c.index

I actually get LESS results, rather than more.

Can someone tell me how to say "if the index isn't in table b, then look in table c?"

share|improve this question
    
Be aware of the difference of Union and Union ALL – Magnus Mar 2 '11 at 16:09

I'm not sure this is what you're after, but it will give you all the results of a, and any possible matches from b OR c.

SELECT *
FROM table_a
   LEFT OUTER JOIN table_b ON table_a.index = table_b.index
   LEFT OUTER JOIN table_c ON table_a.index = table_c.index
share|improve this answer
    
Not quite what I was after, but useful. I was after more a match from table b OR table c. – Soop Mar 2 '11 at 16:46

Did you try a "Union All" ?

SELECT * 
FROM `table_a` 
JOIN table_b ON table_a.index = table_b.index
UNION ALL
SELECT * 
FROM `table_a` 
JOIN table_c ON table_a.index = table_c.index
share|improve this answer
    
Note: Union All will return 2 rows if the index is in both table_b and table_c. – John K. Mar 2 '11 at 16:11
    
Yeah, tried that, and that actually produces one less result IIRC. – Soop Mar 2 '11 at 16:47

First step:

SELECT * FROM
table_a
LEFT JOIN table_b ON table_a.index = table_b.index
LEFT JOIN table_c ON table_b.index = table_c.index

This will get you all indexes from all 3 tables.

If you want to have the first index which isn't NULL from the tables _a, _b, or _c you can do this like this in MySQL:

SELECT COALESCE(table_a.index, table_b.index, table_c.index) AS firstIndexFromABC
FROM
table_a
LEFT JOIN table_b ON table_a.index = table_b.index
LEFT JOIN table_c ON table_b.index = table_c.index

Or what DB are you using? Update: MySQL

Update after some comments:

Sorry, I still don't get it. That's what the COALESCE method does. You get in 1 column combined the value of a if it's there, if not you get b if it's there, if not you get c.

If you mean, that you want the information, from which table you took the index then try this:

SELECT COALESCE(table_a.index, table_b.index, table_c.index) AS firstIndexFromABC, 
CASE WHEN table_a.index IS NULL AND table_b.index IS NULL THEN 'c'
    WHEN table_a.index IS NULL AND table_b.index IS NOT NULL THEN 'b'
    WHEN table_a.index IS NOT NULL THEN 'a'
END AS whichTable
FROM
table_a
LEFT JOIN table_b ON table_a.index = table_b.index
LEFT JOIN table_c ON table_b.index = table_c.index
share|improve this answer
    
It's MySQL... I understand the first one, (unfortunately while useful, as in the first comment, I'm looking for either table b OR table c - not both). The second one I don't understand quite what it's doing. The result is actually just a list of indexes under the heading "firstIndexFromABC". So I guess it's not doing what it's supposed to. – Soop Mar 2 '11 at 16:54
    
"looking for either table b OR table c - not both" <- I don't get it. In the second one the method COALESCE accepts a list of columns and returns the first one which isn't NULL. So with SELECT * you would get a result like index_a | index_b | index_c whereas I assumed that index_a or index_b or index_c can be NULL or two of them, but you will have at least one index. With COALESCE you get the first one in the order a, b, c which has actually an index. – fancyPants Mar 2 '11 at 17:03
    
basically, we need all the fields in table a. The information in b or c should be roughly the same, so if it's not in table b, then I want it to look in table c. Then we should get a list of fields like: a, a, a, a, b, b, b, b, b, b, b, b a, a, a, a, c, c, c, c, c, c, c, c a, a, a, a, b, b, b, b, b, b, b, b a, a, a, a, b, b, b, b, b, b, b, b a, a, a, a, c, c, c, c, c, c, c, c a, a, a, a, b, b, b, b, b, b, b, b a, a, a, a, b, b, b, b, b, b, b, b a, a, a, a, c, c, c, c, c, c, c, c – Soop Mar 3 '11 at 9:28
    
@Soop edited my answer – fancyPants Mar 3 '11 at 10:18

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