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I need a quick way to find out if a given port is open with Ruby. I currently am fiddling around with this:

require 'socket'

def is_port_open?(ip, port)
  begin
    TCPSocket.new(ip, port)
  rescue Errno::ECONNREFUSED
    return false
  end
  return true
end

It works great if the port is open, but the downside of this is that occasionally it will just sit and wait for 10-20 seconds and then eventually time out, throwing a ETIMEOUT exception (if the port is closed). My question is thus:

Can this code be amended to only wait for a second (and return false if we get nothing back by then) or is there a better way to check if a given port is open on a given host?

Edit: Calling bash code is acceptable also as long as it works cross-platform (e.g., Mac OS X, *nix, and Cygwin), although I do prefer Ruby code.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Something like the following might work:

require 'socket'
require 'timeout'

def is_port_open?(ip, port)
  begin
    Timeout::timeout(1) do
      begin
        s = TCPSocket.new(ip, port)
        s.close
        return true
      rescue Errno::ECONNREFUSED, Errno::EHOSTUNREACH
        return false
      end
    end
  rescue Timeout::Error
  end

  return false
end
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Works like a charm! Thanks! –  Chris Bunch Feb 5 '09 at 20:36
    
I had some trouble with this blocking (I think). Basically the timeout wouldn't actually time out. Not sure why, but the netcat solution worked well in its place. –  Mat Schaffer Oct 27 '11 at 16:26
1  
This answer has a solution that also works on windows: stackoverflow.com/a/3473208/362951 –  mit Jul 8 '12 at 20:22
1  
Shouldn't true/false be swapped? –  Leopd Oct 29 '12 at 4:09
    
@Leopd I agree. Fixed. –  Chris Rice Nov 1 '12 at 23:05

More Ruby idiomatic syntax:

require 'socket'
require 'timeout'

def port_open?(ip, port, seconds=1)
  Timeout::timeout(seconds) do
    begin
      TCPSocket.new(ip, port).close
      true
    rescue Errno::ECONNREFUSED, Errno::EHOSTUNREACH
      false
    end
  end
rescue Timeout::Error
  false
end
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This gave a false positive for the inputs '192.0.2.0', 80, 10 which should be invalid (according to stackoverflow.com/questions/10456044/…). I got the same result with Ruby 1.9.3p448 and 2.0.0p195, both on Mac. In what situations does this method manage to return false? (I even tried writing to the socket before closing it, but that still returned true!) –  Glyn Normington Sep 6 '13 at 10:56
    
Just tried '0.0.0.0', 80, 1 and this also gave true. –  Glyn Normington Sep 6 '13 at 11:13
    
works fine for me! –  sunsations Dec 11 '13 at 11:17
    
I think this function def is missing a begin statement before timeout, or is that somehow optional? (rescue Timeout::Error should be in a begin block, shouldn't it?) –  nash Jun 12 at 13:02
    
@nash Ruby permits a rescue clause to belong to the method itself. In effect, the method is an implicit block. –  Wayne Conrad Jun 27 at 23:57

Just for completeness, the Bash would be something like this:

$ netcat $HOST $PORT -w 1 -q 0 </dev/null && do_something

-w 1 specifies a timeout of 1 second, and -q 0 says that, when connected, close the connection as soon as stdin gives EOF (which /dev/null will do straight away).

Bash also has its own built-in TCP/UDP services, but they are a compile-time option and I don't have a Bash compiled with them :P

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1  
They're pretty simple: just pretend /dev/{tcp}/HOST/PORT are files :) –  ephemient Feb 6 '09 at 20:38
1  
For future reference, I found this as nc on my system rather than netcat –  HXCaine Aug 6 '13 at 10:34

My slight variation to Chris Rice's answer. Still handles timing out on a single attempt but also allows multiple retries until you give up.

    def is_port_open?(host, port, timeout, sleep_period)
      begin
        Timeout::timeout(timeout) do
          begin
            s = TCPSocket.new(host, port)
            s.close
            return true
          rescue Errno::ECONNREFUSED, Errno::EHOSTUNREACH
            sleep(sleep_period)
            retry
          end
        end
      rescue Timeout::Error
        return false
      end
    end
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I recently came up with this solution, making use of the unix lsof command:

def port_open?(port)
  !system("lsof -i:#{port}", out: '/dev/null')
end
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