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I am currently in the research phase for a new distributed server framework that will be used for real time simulations (20,000+ clients). We had made a decision to use C#/.NET as our platform, but someone recently passed me some articles on F# and, from the surface, it looks like a great tool to use in developing the server. I am looking for some thoughts from someone who has used F# to solve large, real world, problems.

  • Is F# a good tool for this?

  • What are the pitfalls? We are dealing with lots of interacting messages and a lot of changing state, although that will likely live in a DB cloud of some kind. Functional programming seems to shine in dealing with massive parallelism and distributed computing, but seems to discourage changing any kind of state.

  • Is F# going to stick around? It concerns me that it is so new and I don’t want to tie myself to a dying platform (J# anyone?)…

  • Are there any large, real world solutions (preferably servers) that are using F#?

  • Does F# work well with large teams of engineers? I am sure the answer to this is a simple yes, but I am still very unfamiliar with the language/tools.

Thank you for your time.

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I don't know anything about F#, but it seems foolish (rather, risky) to use any relatively new platform (and especially one that you're unfamiliar with) for a project where you actually expect to get things done. For example, I'd love to dive into scala, and for personal projects, I will. But for projects at work I'm going to stick with things that are both proven and I'm familiar with (in my case java). –  Kevin Mar 2 '11 at 19:50
    
Kevin - I agree with you, and in most cases wouldn’t consider this. However, we are in the R&D phase, and I can get away with risky as long as the potential reward outweighs the risk. –  Karl Strings Mar 2 '11 at 19:59
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Go for it, Karl! I've been using F# for a few years and haven't run into any limitations vs C#. At the bare minimum you'll save your devs a lot of typing. –  Daniel Mar 2 '11 at 20:05
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FWIW - I would rather write even procedural, OO code in F#. I think C# is death by class definition. –  Daniel Mar 2 '11 at 20:06
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For evidence of use, you may glance at the new "F# in the Enterprise" section in the right-hand bar of the dev center: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/fsharp –  Brian Mar 2 '11 at 20:40
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6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

I have spent the past 7 months developing a large real-world heavily-concurrent server in F#. I cannot give you precise details but this is the largest consultancy contract my company has ever landed.

I am looking for some thoughts from someone who has used F# to solve large, real world, problems. Is F# a good tool for this?

Yes. I have no problem developing final commercial products in F# (I did it here and here) but our clients are often most impressed with rapid prototyping using F#. For example, I recently found an internal company document that quoted 3 man months to implement a feature in C++ that had taken me 4 hours with F#!

What are the pitfalls?

There are some quirks in the language but the only major problems I have encountered (that blocked my work for weeks) were bugs in .NET and poor support for Infiniband drivers on Windows, neither of which had anything specifically to do with F#. I had some minor issues with bugs in the F# libraries (e.g. TryScan is broken) but they were easy to work around once I had figured out what the problem was. The F# team have always been extremely good at providing support and accepting suggestions.

Also, note that I am one of the few people who pioneered this technology in industry so I expect you will hit fewer problems than I did and will solve them more quickly because we already solved them for you!

We are dealing with lots of interacting messages and a lot of changing state, although that will likely live in a DB cloud of some kind. Functional programming seems to shine in dealing with massive parallelism and distributed computing, but seems to discourage changing any kind of state.

That is a common misconception. In reality, almost all functional programming languages (e.g. Lisp, Scheme, Clojure, Scala, Standard ML, OCaml, F#, Erlang) are impure and rely upon uncontrolled side effects. Haskell is the only surviving purely functional language and it is completely irrelevant.

In practice, the productivity benefits of F# have more to do with type inference, pattern matching and variant types (from the ML family of languages) and other features like asynchronous workflows, mailbox processors, sequence expressions, interoperability and so on.

Is F# going to stick around? It concerns me that it is so new and I don’t want to tie myself to a dying platform (J# anyone?)…

We have been using F# for 4 years and it continues to go from strength to strength. I think it is very unlikely to die anytime soon, not least because Microsoft are making such good use of F# internally. For example, the F# share of UK job market just tripled in only four months.

Are there any large, real world solutions (preferably servers) that are using F#?

Yes, many. Microsoft continue to use it in Bing AdCenter and Halo 3 and other companies like E-ON, Grange and Credit Suisse seem to have build substantial systems with it. I suspect there are dozens more using it in secret as our client does.

Does F# work well with large teams of engineers? I am sure the answer to this is a simple yes, but I am still very unfamiliar with the language/tools.

If you mean large teams of F# programmers then I don't know: I have only ever worked in teams of up to 4 people using these kinds of languages.

If you mean how does the introduction of F# into part of a large team work, I can use my client as a case study. They had no F# 2 years ago. Today, the top two most productive teams are both using F# and they are solving problems that were believed to be unsolvable before the introduction of F# at the company. The number of people using F# regularly has increased gradually from one person two years ago to around two dozen people today. They have stopped hiring C++ developers and started requiring F# as basic knowledge for new employees.

There are inevitable political issues though. My productivity has raised eyebrows across the company and management have started to question why I am so much more cost effective, putting a lot of pressure on the teams using mainstream languages (C++ and C#). Consequently, we are now coming under fire and losing buy-in within the company because we're making others look bad. I was instructed on Friday to slow down in order to avoid making too many people look bad! So I have now been assigned to multiple projects and am repeating this "success" there. ;-)

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Exactly what I was looking for. Thank you. –  Karl Strings Mar 7 '11 at 18:36
    
No problem. Incidentally, I discussed this with the guy who heads up the biggest F# team here and he said that he was much more concerned about their use of Rx than F# and that Silverlight had proven more troublesome than F#. Overall, F# is considered a huge win here. We also have two new projects using it to prototype potential products in order to assess commercial viability. Best of luck! –  Jon Harrop Mar 8 '11 at 9:26
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I'll stop commenting and make my sentiments official. I'm not going to get into the benefits of functional programming, immutability, ease of parallelism, etc. because that ground has been well-covered elsewhere on SO. Even if you don't know the first thing about functional programming, and intend to write procedural, OO, C#-ish code, I would still recommend F#.

C#

public class Person {
    private readonly string _name;
    private readonly int _age;

    public Person(string name, int age) {
        _name = name;
        _age = age;
    }

    public string Name {
        get { return _name; }
    }

    public int Age {
        get { return _age; }
    }
}

F#

type Person(name, age) =
    member this.Name = name
    member this.Age = age

I think anyone can easily shift from:

foreach (var item in items) {
    //...
}

to:

for item in items do
    //...

and most of the syntactic differences are along similar lines. You can write C#-ish code in F# and slowly ease into functional features, learning along the way. Some time later you'll not only know a new language, but a new way to think about programming problems. In the meantime, I suspect you'll be much more productive.

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Agreed, although the lack of break and continue would throw off most imperative programmers. –  ildjarn Mar 2 '11 at 22:24
    
@ildjarn - That's where F# slowly starts to pull you in. Next thing you know you're a monad factory. –  Daniel Mar 2 '11 at 22:31
    
@ildjarn: if you need break and continue, you're thinking too imperatively. I've been using F# for a few years and have never needed an early return from a loop, and rarely (if ever) needed to write for x in y do .... –  Juliet Mar 3 '11 at 4:25
    
@Juliet : I was responding to "You can write C#-ish code in F# and slowly ease into functional features, learning along the way," making the point that the only hurdle I see for C# programmers is lack of break and continue. I certainly do not think too imperatively. ;-] –  ildjarn Mar 3 '11 at 7:08
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What about type Person = {name:string; age: int}? :-) –  Jon Harrop Mar 8 '11 at 9:27
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Something else to consider would be finding enough developers that know F# to make a large team of engineers. Since it's a new language, that might be the most difficult part.

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+1, good point. The “ramp up” time for our systems engineers should be considered in the total risk/cost. –  Karl Strings Mar 2 '11 at 20:00
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Have one or two of your better engineers spend a few hours on the Try F# Tutorials. They'll have the core of the syntax down by the time they're done. Some functional concepts take longer to fully grok, but it's not rocket surgery. You'll have a better estimate of the "ramp up" time if some of your people get familiar with the language first. –  Joel Mueller Mar 2 '11 at 20:12
    
+1 Joel - I was looking for something like those tutorials. –  Karl Strings Mar 2 '11 at 20:32
    
@Joel Mueller "rocket surgery"--love it. –  Onorio Catenacci Mar 3 '11 at 16:05
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Do read this: F# in the enterprise

It's a paper (just published) on benefits and case studies from real world use of F#. Having learned the language, it gets kind of tiring having to go back to C#. I would push for F# for a project like this, but I'd probably encounter some resistance. :)

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+1, Excellent resource. –  Karl Strings Mar 2 '11 at 22:53
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Others already answered most of the questions regarding F# in general and about developing usual object-oriented systems in F#. I'll add a few specific things about distributed server-side programming.

  • In F#, you can use agents (aka MailboxProcessor) to structure your programs. I had a talk about agents at F# user group in London, so you can find some useful resources there. Agents in F# do not automatically support communication via network, but you can implement that (as an agent). They are, however, a great way to structure concurrent applications and also separate concerns.

  • F# supports asynchronous workflows already - this is essential for writing applications that handle large number of clients without blocking threads. If you don't want to wait for C# 5 (which is getting a feature inspired by F#), then F# is the only option for writing asynchronous code.

  • F# has a lively community with large user groups in London, NY and elsewhere. There are quite a few finacnial companies using F# (as far as I know, some are using or thinking about using agents too). Host-tracker.com is a large server-side application written in F# (see their job-posting)

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+1, Interesting talk. –  Karl Strings Mar 3 '11 at 18:51
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You may also find this case study concerning Grange Insurance in Columbus, OH a good thing to read. I met one of the people from Grange and he was very happy with their decision to write their code in F#.

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