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In java, say I have the following

==fileA.java==
class A
{  
    public static final int SIZE = 100;
}  

Then in another file i use this value

==fileB.java==  
import A;
class b
{
      Object[] temp = new Object[A.SIZE];
}

When this gets compiled does SIZE get replaced with the value 100, so that if i were to down the road replace the FileA.jar but not FileB.jar would the object array get the new value or would it have been hardcoded to 100 because thats the value when it was originally built?

Thanks,
Stephanie

share|improve this question
4  
you mean new Object[A.SIZE]; ? – Bala R Mar 2 '11 at 21:00
1  
You should get a compiler error here. – Sid Mar 2 '11 at 21:01
up vote 16 down vote accepted

Yes, the Java compiler does replace static constant values like SIZE in your example with their literal values.

So, if you would later change SIZE in class A but you don't recompile class b, you will still see the old value in class b. You can easily test this out:

file A.java

public class A {
    public static final int VALUE = 200;
}

file B.java

public class B {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(A.VALUE);
    }
}

Compile A.java and B.java. Now run: java B

Change the value in A.java. Recompile A.java, but not B.java. Run again, and you'll see the old value being printed.

share|improve this answer
    
THis is what i was thinking it would do but there are also several answers below this saying the opposite.. anyone have any documentation to back either direction? – Without Me It Just Aweso Mar 2 '11 at 21:07
    
See my example. The other answers are wrong... – Jesper Mar 2 '11 at 21:07
2  
Is there any method to avoid compiler to do this? – landry Mar 13 '13 at 2:51

Woo - you learn something new everyday!

Taken from the Java spec...

Note: If a primitive type or a string is defined as a constant and the value is known at compile time, the compiler replaces the constant name everywhere in the code with its value. This is called a compile-time constant. If the value of the constant in the outside world changes (for example, if it is legislated that pi actually should be 3.975), you will need to recompile any classes that use this constant to get the current value.

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Really? Replacing a jar implies replacing the class, which is compiled. So that statement does not validate your 'not replaced' claim. A quick decompile of the class file would reveal the correct answer. – Brent Worden Mar 2 '11 at 21:06

Another route to proving that the behavior is to looking at the generated bytecode. When the constant is "small" (presumably < 128):

public B();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #10; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   aload_0
   5:   bipush  42
   7:   anewarray       #3; //class java/lang/Object
   10:  putfield        #12; //Field temp:[Ljava/lang/Object;
   13:  return

}

(I used 42 instead of 100 so it stands out more). In this case, it is clearly substituted in the byte code. But, say the constant is "bigger." Then you get byte code that looks like this:

public B();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #10; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   aload_0
   5:   ldc     #12; //int 86753098
   7:   anewarray       #3; //class java/lang/Object
   10:  putfield        #13; //Field temp:[Ljava/lang/Object;
   13:  return

When it is bigger, the opcode "ldc" is used, which according to the JVM documentation "an unsigned byte that must be a valid index into the runtime constant pool of the current class".

In either case, the constant is embedded into B. I imagine, since that in opcodes you can only access the current classes runtime constant pool, that this the decision to write the constant into the class file is independent of implementation (but I don't know that for a fact).

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1  
You can get that bytecode from a *.class file by using the javap tool that's included with the JDK. – Jesper Mar 2 '11 at 22:14

Actually I ran into this bizarreness a while ago.

This will compile "100" into class b directly. If you just recompile class A, this will not update the value in class B.

On top of that, the compiler may not notice to recompile class b (at the time I was compiling single directories and class B was in a separate directory and compiling a's directory did not trigger a compile of B)

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The important concept here is that the static final field is initialised with a compile-time constant, as defined in the JLS. Use a non-constant initialiser (or non-static or non-final) and it wont be copied:

public static final int SIZE = null!=null?0: 100;

(null is not a *compile-time constant`.)

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I think creating a dummy CONST() method and then doing "SIZE = CONST(100);" would be easier to read. stackoverflow.com/a/12065326/290254 – Julius Davies Aug 22 '12 at 1:47

You can keep the constant from being compiled into B, by doing

class A
{  
    public static final int SIZE;

    static 
    {
        SIZE = 100;
    }
}  
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks: this helped me in a weird scenario: I'm using ikvm to compile java to .NET and my static final fields were rendered as 'const' in C# (which exhibits the same inlining behavior). I wanted to have ikvm generate 'static readonly' which is constant but is not inlined in dependant assemblies. I applied you solution to my java code, and ikvm gracefully generated public static readonly in SIZE = 100; which is ok in C#! – odalet Oct 6 '14 at 20:23

As an optimization the compiler will inline that final variable.

So at compile time it will look like.

class b
{
      Object[] temp = new Object[100];
}
share|improve this answer

Java does optimise these sorts of values but only if they are in the same class. In this case the JVM looks in A.SIZE rather than optimizing it because of the usage case you are considering.

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what kind of usecase would cause it to replace vs not replace the value at compile time? – Without Me It Just Aweso Mar 2 '11 at 21:07
1  
that is wrong, if it is a compile-time constant, it will be substituted at compile time, no matter in which class it is defined or used. – Carlos Heuberger Mar 3 '11 at 12:16

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