Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am looking into X509Certificates and keytool and I am confused on the following:
A certificate can be stored in cer (Canonical Encoding Rules) format as well as in DER?
I am reviewing various tutorials by SUN on keytool and in some cases they seem to import a certificate ending in ".cer" or exporting one with the extension ".cer".
E.g.

keytool -importcert -alias abc -file ABCCA.cer  OR  
keytool -exportcert -alias mykey -file MJ.cer

Does this mean cer encoding?Because initially I had the impresion that if you do an export on keytool the default is der.
Or is cer and der interchangeable?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
There is no such thing as cer encoding for a certificate. ".cer" is just a common but otherwise meaningless file extension used for certificates. I believe Microsoft uses it by default for DER-encoded X509 certificates, because Microsoft must always do things differently even when they do them the same. –  GregS Mar 2 '11 at 23:54
    
@GregS:So is it correct to say that the certificates are only expected to be in DER or PEM format?So the actual filename extension is irrelevant? –  Cratylus Mar 3 '11 at 7:05
    
DER is an encoding rules applicable to any data described by ASN.1, not just certificates. PEM is also an encoding method that involves base-64 encoding the DER content and slapping header and footer lines around the result. keytool supports DER-encoded X509 certificates as well as the PEM encoding of the DER encoding of X509 certificates. Additionally, for certificate chains keytool supports DER-encoded PKCS#7 objects as well as the PEM encoding of these. The file extension is always irrelevant. –  GregS Mar 3 '11 at 12:47
    
So if file extension is not relevant, if a user supplies a file path in a java program to a file that could be in DER,PEM,P12 or PKCS7 format, how would this be handled in the program?I mean I am interested to know if it is required to know the encoding of the file before doing any processing with it.For instance, detecting that the supplied file is in DER so Base64 encode it before e.g. saving as a text file or storing it in DB etc. And if it is already in PEM just store it.Do not do anything else i.e. encode it –  Cratylus Mar 3 '11 at 16:19
1  
I'm not sure how keytool does it exactly. You can pretty much figure out from the first "few" bytes of the file. The PEM files start out with something like ---BEGIN something so if you see that you know that you need to base64 decode the remaining lines to get the DER encoding. Otherwise it should already be the DER encoding. Next you examine the first few bytes of the DER encoding to see if it is consistent with an X509 Certficate encoding, or a PKCS#7 structure, or neither. –  GregS Mar 3 '11 at 23:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

By default, keytool exports using DER ("Distinguished Encoding Rules"), a common binary encoding for X509 certificates.

It's just an unfortunate coincidence that CER is the name of another ASN.1 encoding, as well as being the first three letters of "certificate"...

share|improve this answer
    
So is it correct to say that the certificates are only expected to be in DER or PEM format?So the actual filename extension is irrelevant? –  Cratylus Mar 3 '11 at 7:04
    
Yup, it exports in DER unless you use the -rfc option, in which case it uses PEM (which is really just base64-encoded DER with a header and footer). For import it supports DER, PEM and PKCS#7; the file extension is irrelevant. –  SimonJ Mar 3 '11 at 8:00
    
So if file extension is not relevant, if a user supplies a file path in a java program to a file that could be in DER,PEM,P12 or PKCS7 format, how would this be handled in the program?I mean I am interested to know if it is required to know the encoding of the file before doing any processing with it.For instance, detecting that the supplied file is in DER so Base64 encode it before e.g. saving as a text file or storing it in DB etc. And if it is already in PEM just store it.Do not do anything else i.e. encode it –  Cratylus Mar 3 '11 at 16:17
    
Not quite sure what you're asking. keytool normally stores keys and certificates in its own "JKS" format (unless you have some alternative provider installed), so it converts the various encodings to/from that as necessary. –  SimonJ Mar 3 '11 at 21:10
    
In case of a java program (any application program that a programmer creates that handles certificates to provide security feature) gets a file specified by the user.How can this program "tell" if the file supplied by the user is P12 or PEM or DER or PKCS7?Is the user supposed to specify the format? –  Cratylus Mar 3 '11 at 21:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.