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I've recently tried to simplify some of my code by using generics where possible. However, this particular example has me stumped... Yet it looks so innocent!

Here's the offending code (simplified).

public static void Updater(CommodityVO vo)
{
    // Update something
}

public static void BulkUpdate<T>(IEnumerable<T> vos)
{
    foreach (var vo in vos)
    {
        Updater(vo);
    }
}

In Visual Studio, the 'vo' in 'Updater(vo)' gets a squiggly line and the compiler (VS2010) reports:

Argument type 'T' is not assignable to parameter type CommodityVO

  • It doesn't seem to matter what the type of 'vo' is. eg: string doesn't work either.
  • List<T> behaves the same as IEnumerable<T>
  • Various 'where' clauses seemed to have no effect.
  • I have worked around this issue for now. But I'd like to know why this was rejected... Especially since it all looks fine to me. What am I missing?

    All help appreciated.

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    T could be any type at all. You have to constrain T to all types that are valid for Updater() You'd need a Where clause for that (you were right there). What where clauses have you used? –  Crisfole Mar 2 '11 at 22:24

    3 Answers 3

    up vote 12 down vote accepted

    What you're looking for here is a generic constraint. The type T needs to be constrained to be an instance of CommodityVO

    public static void BulkUpdate<T>(IEnumerable<T> vos) where T : CommodityVO {
      foreach (var vo in vos) {
        Updater(vo);
      }
    }
    

    Without this generic constraint the C# compiler has no information on the generic parameter T and must assume the worst case that T is instantiated as object. The type object is not compatible with CommodityVO and hence it issues an error. By adding the constraint you are limiting the values T can be instantiated as to CommodityVO or types deriving from CommodityVO which means the conversion to CommodityVO is legal and hence allowed.

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    1  
    I was at first going to post a very hackish way of getting around this, but then noticed it might be better to show the right way first. :) +1 –  Mehrdad Mar 2 '11 at 22:23
        
    Of course! Ok, I feel pretty silly now. I actually tried this earlier. But I have other types (in addition to CommodityVO) and too hastily discounted this option without properly thinking about WHY it worked. In my defence, I was at the tail end of a twelve hour day. :) Many thanks, guys! –  MojoMagic Mar 2 '11 at 23:08

    The Updater function can only handle objects of type CommodityVO.

    If this is a base type of various types you want to be able to pass to Updater, add a where constraint. where T : CommodityVO

    share|improve this answer

    This should work

    public static void BulkUpdate<T>(IEnumerable<T> vos) where T : CommodityVO
    {
        foreach (var vo in vos)
        {
            Updater(vo);
        }
    }
    

    You want to constrain the generic type T to a type your Updater function actually accepts.

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