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Here's what the HTML looks like:

<dt> Static text. </dt>
<dd>
    <a onclick="bunch of ajax stuff", href="#">
        Dynamic Text!
    </a>
</dd>

I tried to use the <dt> to locate the <dd> element with the code $browser.dd(:after? => $browser.dt(:text => /Static text./)).text, but that gives an undefined method 'join' for #<String:0xblah> error. The dd doesn't have an id or anything to locate it with. I was able to get the .text from it by doing a regex search for part of it in irb, but that won't work too well long-term since it's a dynamic value.

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1  
what do you 'know' about the dt tag? I presume by 'get the data' you mean the text, or perhaps the href. Do you know if this will be the only DD tag inside that particular DD? Does the static text appear anywhere else in the document or is it unique? do you know the thing inside the dd will always be a link? –  Chuck van der Linden Mar 3 '11 at 1:14
    
if portion of "bunch of ajax stuff" is unique, you could use that to access the link –  Željko Filipin Mar 3 '11 at 9:06
    
Yeah, I meant the text that I showed as "Dynamic Text!" in the question. That's what I need to grab. The entire chunk of text is a DL that contains a DT (static), and two DDs containing dynamic text. I can easily grab the second one because it has an id. The static text is unique on that page. The dd that I'm having trouble with is always a link, but the link isn't unique. –  VGambit Mar 3 '11 at 14:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I assume your HTML looks like the following, plusing your above comment. Is that correct?


<dl>
<dt> Static text. </dt>
<dd>
    <a onclick="bunch of ajax stuff", href="#">
        Dynamic Text!
    </a>
</dd>
<dd id='foo'>
    bar
</dd>
</dl>

If so, you might be able to get the first DD text like this.

browser.dt(:text,/Static text/).parent.dd(:index,1).text

or

browser.dt(:text,/Static text/).parent.dds.first.text

If you can grab the second DD easily, the following is worth to try, I think

browser.dd(:id,'foo').parent.dds.first.text

or

browser.element(:id,'foo').parent.dds.first.text

or.. If the target DD is always the next sibling of DT, try element_by_xpath. It's my last resort :)

browser.dt(:text,/Static text/).element_by_xpath('following-sibling::*').text
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最初のオプションは完璧です。 browser.dt(:text,/Static text/).parent.dd(:index,1).text worked perfectly. Thanks! Also, that is what the html looks like. –  VGambit Mar 3 '11 at 16:36
    
Great approach, that's the first time I've seen the parent method used. I thought I knew watir pretty good and you've taught me a new trick. I love it when that happens –  Chuck van der Linden Mar 4 '11 at 17:07
    
I'm so glad that my answer have helped your watir scripts :) –  Yutaka Yamaguchi Mar 6 '11 at 15:51

Presuming the status text is unique, have you tried something along the lines of

 browser.dt(:text, /Static text/).dd(:index, 1).text
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I tried that, but it threw an "unable to locate object" exception. –  VGambit Mar 3 '11 at 14:31
    
Mine would only work if the DD is inside the DT, and I missed the fact that such is not the case. Yataka has the correct trick for it, by using the 'parent' object of the known sibling, to find the other one. (that's also something new to me, I wonder if that was added recently, or if it's always been there and I've never known about it. –  Chuck van der Linden Mar 4 '11 at 17:07

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