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This is a thing that puzzles me. I know that when you use Euler angles and apply rotations to objects you have to stick to one axis sequence, for example, XYZ, in order to avoid gimbal lock. My question is the reverse.

Imagine I have quaternions that I want to convert to Euler angles. So, I take all those quaternions and convert to a sequence of rotations to be applied on 3 axis in my object.

These are the questions:

  • if I follow conversions like the one shown in this Wikipedia page will I obtain angles that go from -PI to PI in all 3 axis?
  • now I have the angles, how do I know which order I should apply to the object?
  • do this formulas of Wikipedia imply that I must use a particular axis transformation sequence as XYZ or something?
  • is there a different formula for different axis sequences?

what I am looking for are the formulas to convert to the aeronautics notation sequence (see picture)

My math is a little bit rusty, so please don't make your answer too mathematically exoteric.

thanks in advance.

enter image description here

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I think this might belong on Math Overflow...? –  Jonathan Grynspan Mar 3 '11 at 1:46
    
The guys at Math Overflow never answer questions like that. The will crap on your head if you try. Believe me, I have tried once and closed my account after they crapped on my head. They are very pedant, important and busy to ask questions like that. The exact opposite of Stack Overflow. If you want to try, be my guest... :D –  RubberDuck Mar 6 '11 at 21:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I know that when you use Euler angles and apply rotations to objects you have to stick to one axis sequence, for example, XYZ, in order to avoid gimbal lock.

That's not entirely right. Not only do you have to stick with a particular axis sequence, you also have to stick with a particular reference frame for the rotations. You would typically hear of body-fixed and global-fixed rotations (the difference between the two is mainly about the order in which the elementary rotations get multiplied) BTW, you will get that same problem when using quaternions. Euler Angles are a family of rotation representations there are basically 12 unique sequences of elementary rotations that you can do to achieve the final rotation matrix. Plus the two possible reference frames, that gives you 24 possible representations that are all referred to as "Euler Angles" (although 12 are redundant). The most usual versions that you find are "3-2-1 body-fixed" and "1-2-3 global" (this are the same), "1-2-3 body-fixed" (inverse sequence), "3-1-3 body-fixed" (very much used in robotics), and finally the Tait-Bryan ("1-(minus)2-3 global-fixed" or "roll-pitch-yaw"). You have to stick to one convention.

Wikipedia is not to be trusted in this matter (try mathworld instead, or a real text-book). On the page you linked to, the formula corresponds to "1-2-3 body-fixed" (at least that is what is said there).

Finally, the "gimbal lock" can never be avoided, they are inherent to any Euler Angles convention, they are unavoidable. If you get a math text-book, you can read on why that is.

if I follow conversions like the one shown in this Wikipedia page will I obtain angles that go from -2PI to 2PI in all 3 axis?

No, you will get two of the angles in a range from -Pi to Pi, and one angle from -Pi/2 to Pi/2 (again, that will be the case for all conventions). For the wiki formula, you will get Phi in [-Pi,Pi], Theta in [-Pi/2,Pi/2], and Psi in [-Pi,Pi].

now I have the angles, how do I know which order I should apply to the object?

For "1-2-3 body-fixed", it is x first, then y, then z. Since it is body-fixed, the order of the rotations matrices is indeed Rx Ry Rz. That resulting matrix will be can be used to pre-multiply with a vector whose components are expressed in the coordinate frame of the rotated object, and transform to components expressed in the "global" coordinate frame.

is there a different formula for different axis sequences?

Yes, of course. Every convention has a different formula. This is why, in certain applications, people prefer different conventions because they can sort-of avoid getting near the singular points which correspond to mathematical singularities in the conversion equations. Conventions have different singularities, and sometimes that can be exploited (and avoided) if there is a particular geometry to your system.

My math is a little bit rusty, so please don't make your answer too mathematically exoteric.

Hopefully I didn't... but 3D rotations aren't the easiest topic for sure. They get very confusing at times, and you should do it carefully. In my experience, you are always better off sticking with quaternions all the way (with exception of occasional use of rotation matrices when needed).

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Thanks for the answer. The only remaining questions are these: 1) which formulas should I use for XYZ sequence? 2)I have to use the angles obtained from the quaternions to rotate an object. I have really to use the angles, not matrices or quaternions to rotate that. So, if one angle will just rotate from -pi/2 to pi/2 how do I know the correct orientation the object should be displayed. In other words: there's a way to obtain [-pi, pi] in all axis? There's any solution for that? –  RubberDuck Mar 3 '11 at 2:12
    
If it's used for displaying, then what you need is the rotation matrix (not Euler angles). OpenGL has glMultMatrixf() for that, and I'm sure there is something similar in DirectX. In this case, you should calculate the matrix from the quaternion directly (it is faster, safer, and more numerically stable). For the formula for XYZ (global), you can easily figure it out by multiplying the 3 basic matrices to get the rotation matrix (like on wiki) and solve for the angles. As for ranges, NO, the angles are unique only if one is restricted to a half-circle (but all rotations CAN be represented). –  Mikael Persson Mar 3 '11 at 2:29
    
thanks. I will try to figure it out based on this!!! –  RubberDuck Mar 3 '11 at 2:33

Here are answers.

  1. No. You will obtain angles that go from -PI to PI. Which is what the range should be because angles that are 2PI apart are the same.
  2. Rotate x, then y, then z.
  3. Yes they do. They have written Rz(psi)Ry(theta)Rx(phi). To apply a matrix to a vector you put the vector on the right and multiply. Therefore you first multiply by Rx(phi), then multiply the result of that by Ry(theta) and then multiply that by Rz(psi).
  4. Yes, there are different formulas. You can figure out the other variations by exchanging x, y, z and phi, theta, psi in the same way. But unless you have to, don't. Because that way lies confusion.

BTW a tip for you. The way you use the word "doubt" in your first sentence strongly suggests that you are Indian. Many English speakers from other parts of the world will see it as a mistake that suggests you don't know English very well. If you want to make a good impression on them, find a phrasing that avoids that word. For instance, "This is what I am confused about." Or, "Here is where I am puzzled."

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-1 you are describing one particular convention of Euler Angles, there are 16 of them. And your answers are wrong. Sorry.. –  Mikael Persson Mar 3 '11 at 1:30
    
@btilly - no I am not Indian, but English is not my natural language. I will correct that! :D –  RubberDuck Mar 3 '11 at 1:37
    
@Mikael Persson - if you san the answer is wrong, can you give us the correct one? Just dismissing btilly answer and not giving one makes no sense. Sorry. I really appreciate if you can give the correct one. Thanks. –  RubberDuck Mar 3 '11 at 1:39
    
@btilly (again) - of course, my fault, I meant -PI to PI... I have corrected the question. Thanks. –  RubberDuck Mar 3 '11 at 1:44
    
@Digital Robot: Well, it just took me a little while to write it up. –  Mikael Persson Mar 3 '11 at 1:55

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