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I am making a new program in c++ i get the current error

expected primary-expression before ‘int’

about this line

p1::pascals_triangle(int depth);
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6  
Show us the code! –  Keith Mar 3 '11 at 2:06
2  
He didn't mean format the code! He meant show us some context! That one line uses a namespace or class and a function/method in it that take an integer as a parameter. Where are all of those things declared and defined? X| –  Sion Sheevok Mar 3 '11 at 2:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

p1 needs to be an existing namespace or class name.

If that does not solve the problem you will have to give some surrounding code to make sense of your question ;)

Good luck.

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'code' int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { double (*pf)(double k); // declares the function pointer pf = &p1::test_function;//test_function; // sets the value of 'pf' to the add\ ress of the 'p1::test_function' function. p1::pascals_triangle(int depth); return 0; } 'code' –  user570098 Mar 3 '11 at 2:09
2  
@user570098: Edit the code into the question, and be sure to indent it four places so it will be formatted as code. As-is, it's impossible to be certain where your single-line comments end. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 3 '11 at 2:12
    
@user570098: that does not answer the question about p1 ;) –  0xC0000022L Mar 3 '11 at 2:14

Unless you're declaring a method, you probably don't need the keyword "int".

#include <iostream>


namespace foo {
    void pascals_triangle(int depth) {
        std::cout << depth << std::endl;
    }

    int another_method(int y);
}

using namespace std;

int
foo::another_method(int y) {
    cout << "called another_method with " << y << endl;
    return 8;
}

int main(void) {
    int x = 5;
    foo::pascals_triangle(x);
    foo::another_method(x + 1);
    return 0;
}

If I were to write instead:

int main(void) {
    int x = 5;
    foo::pascals_triangle(int x);
    foo::another_method(x + 1);
    return 0;
}

I'd get:

In function ‘int main()’:
error: expected primary-expression before ‘int’
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using namespace std; int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { .... –  user570098 Mar 3 '11 at 2:13
    
using namespace std; /** * Note the namespace qualifier used here - I did not bring 'p1' in * scope, therefore we need the "p1::" to preceed the function definitions. */ void p1::pascals_triangle(int depth) { // Implement problem 1 in here. –  user570098 Mar 3 '11 at 2:13
    
@user570098: whoa. Offering bits and pieces? So where does p1 come from? We know now it's a namespace at least ... –  0xC0000022L Mar 3 '11 at 2:16
using namespace std;

/**                                                                             
 * Note the namespace qualifier used here - I did not bring 'p1' in             
 * scope, therefore we need the "p1::" to preceed the function definitions.     
 */
void p1::pascals_triangle(int depth) {
  // Implement problem 1 in here.                                               

//this is my functions.cpp using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

  // Need to implement argument processing here                                                                        
  // If you want to set a function pointer, you just take the                                                          
  // address of the function ('&' means 'take address of'):                                                            

  double (*pf)(double k); // declares the function pointer                                                             
  pf = &p1::test_function;//test_function; // sets the value of 'pf' to the address of      the 'p1::test_function' functio\
   n.                                                                                                                     

  p1::pascals_triangle(int depth);

// that is main

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1  
You can edit your original question. It makes no sense to append parts of your question as an answer. –  0xC0000022L Mar 3 '11 at 2:22
    
Don't post an answer to update your question. Edit your question. –  Delan Azabani Mar 3 '11 at 2:22
    
@user570098: still does not show the relevant code portions. The question that remains is how you introduce the namespace. The mere fucntion declaration is not enough. It would have to be declared within the namespace ... –  0xC0000022L Mar 3 '11 at 2:29
    
Please use the Post answer button only for actual answers. You should modify your original question to add additional information. –  Robert Harvey Mar 3 '11 at 2:54

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