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I have 2 files.

For example, the content of file #1 is:

hi1
hi2
hi4

… of file #2 is:

hi1
hi4
hi3
hi5

I would like to sort out these documents so that a third file would contain just:

hi2
hi3
hi5

Can anyone toss me in the right direction? I'm in dire need! Perl is wanted, but C/C++ is accepted.

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Why not hi2 as well? –  Platinum Azure Mar 3 '11 at 2:58
    
Sorry, I caught that when I proofread it, thanks for the notice. –  Saustin Bentley Mar 3 '11 at 2:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a quick bit of code to do what you want. There's no error checking, and I'm assuming that your text files are not so huge that you'll run out of memory by loading all the text into a hash array.

open(FILE1, "< file1.txt");
open(FILE2, "< file2.txt");

@file1 = <FILE1>;
@file2 = <FILE2>;

foreach $line (@file1, @file2)
{
    chomp($line);
    $TEXT{$line}++;
}

foreach $line (sort keys %TEXT)
{
    if ($TEXT{$line} == 1)
    {
         print $line . "\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is going along the lines of what I want; however the output is such:hi2 hi3 hi4hi4 hi5 –  Saustin Bentley Mar 3 '11 at 3:37
    
Ah, then we needto strip the EOL and put it back at the end. I'll correct the annswer. –  darklion Mar 3 '11 at 3:47
    
PERFECT! Thank you, speedy response too! –  Saustin Bentley Mar 3 '11 at 4:04

I know you asked for perl or C, but in Unix (or with MKS or equivalent Unix on Windows toolkit):

sort file1 file2 | uniq -u > file3

It doesn't get much simpler than that.

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Count each line, then print out the ones where the count is one:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

local @ARGV = ('file.1', 'file.2');
my %lines;
while (<>) {
    $lines{$_}++;
}

print sort grep $lines{$_} == 1, keys %lines;
share|improve this answer

Still not sure you are describing the problem completely. hi3 is not duplicated, but hi4 is. So should the output contain hi3 instead of hi4? Hint: to detect duplicates in perl, you probably want to use a hash.

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Sorry; I'm in bit of a scram... –  Saustin Bentley Mar 3 '11 at 3:33

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