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I would like to use to_dollar method in my model like this:

module JobsHelper      
  def to_dollar(amount)
    if amount < 0
      number_to_currency(amount.abs, :precision => 0, :format => "-%u%n")
    else
      number_to_currency(amount, :precision => 0)
    end
  end      
end

class Job < ActiveRecord::Base
  include JobsHelper
  def details
    return "Only " + to_dollar(part_amount_received) + 
           " out of " + to_dollar(price) + " received."
  end
end

Unfortunately, the number_to_currency method is not recognized here:

undefined method `number_to_currency' for #<Job:0x311eb00>

Any ideas how to make it work ?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It’s not available because its use in a model (typically) violates MVC (and it does seem to in your case). You're taking data and manipulating it for presentation. This, by definition, belongs in the view, not the model.

Here are some solutions:

  • Use a presenter instead to wrap the model object. This may or may not work depending on your specific use case, and almost definitely requires more initial work than other solutions, but is often a better design. (Using helpers in a presenter doesn’t violate MVC, as presenters are more a replacement for helpers, and lives at the same level.)

  • Explicitly include ActionView::Helpers::NumberHelper in JobsHelper instead of depending on Rails to have magically loaded it for you. This is still not great, as you shouldn’t access a helper from a model.

  • Violate MVC. See fguillen’s answer for how to do this. I won’t echo it here because I don’t agree with it. Even more so, though, do I disagree with polluting your model with presentation methods as in Sam’s answer.

If you think “but I really need this to write my to_csv & to_pdf methods in my model!”, then you’re entire premise is wrong—after all, you don’t have a to_html method, do you? And yet your object is very often rendered as HTML. Consider creating a new object for generating your output instead of making your data model know what a CSV is (because it shouldn’t).

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2  
I usually follow this rule but break it when I need a view helper to format a validation error message defined in the model. –  Florent2 Mar 3 '11 at 14:58
    
Rails collection select helpers do not respect MVC because they want to perform a model instance method on the selectable item to determine what to display. So in that case you can hack around the framework or violate MVC. –  Tony Dec 6 '11 at 23:13
16  
This is good advice, but it's a bad answer because it does not solve the question. –  Jaryl Jun 29 '12 at 10:28
7  
There are cases where this is not a great answer, for instance right now where I am buiding a csv report and need to use something like this in a to_csv method in a class that will never see a view. Just sprouting programming ideals is not always helpful. –  nitecoder Jul 30 '12 at 0:53
    
Yea, what nitecoder said. I'm running into the same issue. I'm generating PDF reports and simply want to nicely format a phone number. –  James Adam Nov 26 '12 at 0:09

I agree with all of you that this could be breaking the MVC pattern but there is always reasons to break a pattern, in my case I needed these currency formatter methods to use them in a template filter (Liquid in my case).

At the end I found out I could access to these currency formatter methods using things like this:

ActionController::Base.helpers.number_to_currency
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3  
This is good, though there is a slightly cleaner way of doing it. See http://railscasts.com/episodes/132-helpers-outside-views –  user664833 Apr 4 '12 at 18:09
1  
Yay comment track in RailsCasts: In Rails 3 in 2013, using a View helper in a Controller is done like view_context.number_to_currency(amount) –  olleolleolle Jul 30 '13 at 8:08
    
Have you thought about using the "money" gem? As money object provides a format() method, and you can invoke it in the model, controller, or view. –  Zack Xu Aug 8 '13 at 13:43
1  
+1 for "there are always reasons to break a pattern". And for a solution that does the job ;) –  user456584 Sep 3 '13 at 21:20

You need to also include the ActionView::Helpers::NumberHelper

class Job < ActiveRecord::Base
  include ActionView::Helpers::NumberHelper
  include JobsHelper
  def details
    return "Only " + to_dollar(part_amount_received) + 
           " out of " + to_dollar(price) + " received."
  end
end
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2  
Thanks, looks good, but I have to agree with others that say I violate the MVC. I'll put details in the helper. –  Misha Moroshko Mar 3 '11 at 4:53
    
Helpful if you are like Florent2 and need to put it as part of a validation message. Thanks Sam. –  RyanJM May 18 '11 at 17:01
    
This worked for me. I don't think it makes sense to always follow MVC (or any principle) if a solution that violates that principle is clearly better than one that adheres to it. –  Jason Swett Jul 10 '11 at 3:43
2  
This approach is not recommended. It adds a lot of methods which you don't need, and it clutters up your namespace, it may overwrite some methods, and some helper modules rely on other helper modules (so you may need to include multiple modules), thereby making the issue even worse. For an explanation and better approach, see: http://railscasts.com/episodes/132-helpers-outside-views –  user664833 Apr 4 '12 at 18:06

Piggybacking off of @fguillen's response, I wanted to override the number_to_currency method in my ApplicationHelper module so that if the value was 0 or blank that it would output a dash instead.

Here's my code in case you guys would find something like this useful:

module ApplicationHelper
  def number_to_currency(value)
    if value == 0 or value.blank?
      raw "&ndash;"
    else
      ActionController::Base.helpers.number_to_currency(value)
    end
  end
end
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Why are you trying to put that in your Model? Anything relating to output belongs in your views and helpers.

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@fguillen's way is good, though here's a slightly cleaner approach, particular given that the question makes two references to to_dollar. I'll first demonstrate using Ryan Bates' code (http://railscasts.com/episodes/132-helpers-outside-views).

def description
  "This category has #{helpers.pluralize(products.count, 'product')}."
end

def helpers
  ActionController::Base.helpers
end

Notice the call helpers.pluralize. This is possible due to the method definition (def helpers), which simply returns ActionController::Base.helpers. Therefore helpers.pluralize is short for ActionController::Base.helpers.pluralize. Now you can use helpers.pluralize multiple times, without repeating the long module paths.

So I suppose the answer to this particular question could be:

class Job < ActiveRecord::Base
  include JobsHelper
  def details
    return "Only " + helpers.to_dollar(part_amount_received) + 
           " out of " + helpers.to_dollar(price) + " received."
  end

  def helpers
    ActionView::Helpers::NumberHelper
  end
end
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Helper methods are generally used for View files. It is not a good practice to use these methods in Model class. But if you want to use then Sam's answer is ok. OR I suggest you can write your own custom method.

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Here are examples on how to use the number_to_currency helper

number_to_currency(1234567890.50)                    # => $1,234,567,890.50
number_to_currency(1234567890.506)                   # => $1,234,567,890.51
number_to_currency(1234567890.506, precision: 3)     # => $1,234,567,890.506
number_to_currency(1234567890.506, locale: :fr)      # => 1 234 567 890,51 €
number_to_currency("123a456")                        # => $123a456

number_to_currency("123a456", raise: true)           # => InvalidNumberError

number_to_currency(-1234567890.50, negative_format: "(%u%n)")
# => ($1,234,567,890.50)
number_to_currency(1234567890.50, unit: "&pound;", separator: ",", delimiter: "")
# => &pound;1234567890,50
number_to_currency(1234567890.50, unit: "&pound;", separator: ",", delimiter: "", format: "%n %u")
# => 1234567890,50 &pound;
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