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Hey I am a python rookie and I am trying to setup a dict in the constructor of a class how ever, whenever I try to access an element, it returns None. Here is my code

class GoogleApp:

  def __init__(self, path):
    self.name = "Google App"
    self.description = "Creates an new google app project."
    self.title = None
    self.path = path
    self.pre_defined_macros = {
      '_NAME': self.name , 
      '_DESCRIPTION': self.description,
      '_TITLE': "Shoutout",
      '_BASE_PATH': self.path,
      '_PATH': lambda: os.path.join(self.path, self.title)
    }

Now whenever I try to access self.pre_defined_macros['_TITLE'] from some other method it returns None.

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underscore implies private variable. what happens when you give without an underscore. –  doc_180 Mar 3 '11 at 6:03
    
@doc_180: Not in a dict key. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 3 '11 at 6:04
    
@ignacio, yes are correct. I am way to sleepy for answering. –  doc_180 Mar 3 '11 at 6:09

2 Answers 2

Can you post sample code?

I ask this because I'm not sure what you are trying to do. <instance>.pre_defined_macros['_TITLE'] worked fine when I tested it.

>>> class GoogleApp:

  def __init__(self, path):
    self.name = "Google App"
    self.description = "Creates an new google app project."
    self.title = None
    self.path = path
    self.pre_defined_macros = {
      '_NAME': self.name , 
      '_DESCRIPTION': self.description,
      '_TITLE': "Shoutout",
      '_BASE_PATH': self.path,
      '_PATH': lambda: os.path.join(self.path, self.title)
    }


>>> f  = GoogleApp('foo')
>>> f.pre_defined_macros['_TITLE']
'Shoutout'
>>> 

I also tried accessing pre_defined_macros from another method. Like so:

>>> class GoogleApp:
    def __init__(self, path):
        # Your original code here.
    def get_title(self):
        return self.pre_defined_macros['_TITLE']


>>> f  = GoogleApp('foo')
>>> f.get_title()
'Shoutout'
>>> 
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry! Actually '_TITLE': "Shoutout" –  Utsav Mar 3 '11 at 6:12
    
Sorry! Actually '_TITLE': "Shoutout" worked however it's returning None when '_TITLE' = self.title , just like I am having the same problem with '_DESCRIPTION' and '_NAME' –  Utsav Mar 3 '11 at 6:14

Aah ... Got it!

Actually I've set

self.title = None

So while creating the dictionary

'_TITLE': self.title

None is the value for '_TITLE'

Lack of concentration !!

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