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Sorry for probably simple question but I'm a newby in Django and really confused.

I have an ugly legacy tables that I can not change.
It has 2 tables:

class Salespersons(models.Model):
    id = models.IntegerField(unique=True, primary_key=True)
    xsin = models.IntegerField()
    name = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    surname = models.CharField(max_length=200)

class Store(models.Model):
    id = models.IntegerField(unique=True, primary_key=True)
    xsin = models.IntegerField()
    brand = models.CharField(max_length=200)

So I suppose I can not add Foreign keys in class definitions because they change the tables.

I need to execute such sql request:

SELECT * FROM Salespersons, Store INNER JOIN Store ON (Salespersons.xsin = Store.xsin);

How can I achieve it using Django ORM?
Or I'm allowed to get Salespersons and Store separately i.e.

stores = Store.objects.filter(xsin = 1000)
salespersons = Salespersons.objects.filter(xsin = 1000)
share|improve this question
    
It depends on what exactly are you trying to retrieve. What does xsin mean? Does it "point" to a 3rd table? –  Béres Botond Mar 3 '11 at 9:11
    
xsin is a field by which some tables are joined. Yes, it can be used to join the third table. –  gennad Mar 3 '11 at 9:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Given your example query, are your tables actually named Salespersons/Store? Anyway, something like this should work:

results = Salespersons.objects.extra(tables=["Store"],
                          where=["""Salespersons.xsin = Store.xsin"""])

However, given the names of the tables/models it doesn't seem to me that an inner join would be logically correct. Unless you always have just 1 salesperson per store with same xsin.

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If you can make one of the xsin fields unique, you can use a ForeignKey with to_field to generate the inner join like this:

class Salespersons(models.Model):
    xsin = models.IntegerField(unique=True)

class Store(models.Model):
    xsin = models.ForeignKey(Salespersons, db_column='xsin', to_field='xsin')

>>> Store.objects.selected_related('xsin')
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, really valuable. But what if I want to create an another Foreign Key in Store class. This foreign key will point to another table, for example class StoreCredentials(models.Model): xsin = models.IntegerField(unique=True). Is it possible to achieve? –  gennad Mar 4 '11 at 4:58

I don't see why you can't use the models.ForeignKey fields even if the database lacks the constraints -- if you don't explicitly execute the SQL to change the database then the tables won't change. If you use a ForeignKey then you can use Salespersons.objects.select_related('xsin') to request that the related objects are fetched at the same time.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you provide an example for Foreign Key please? –  gennad Mar 3 '11 at 8:41
    
class Salespersons(models.Model): id = models.IntegerField(unique=True, primary_key=True) xsin = models.IntegerField() name = models.CharField(max_length=200) surname = models.CharField(max_length=200) store = models.ForeignKey(Customer) If I will do like this, Django will create store_id field if I unserstand it correctly –  gennad Mar 3 '11 at 8:44
    
Excuse me for this. I mean: store = models.ForeignKey(Customer) –  gennad Mar 3 '11 at 8:45
    
@gennad: Yes it will create store_id with FK constraint. But why would you name store a FK field towards Customer? –  Béres Botond Mar 3 '11 at 9:20
    
Hm... Sorry, did not understand. How could I achieve is using Foreign Key ? Is there a better way? –  gennad Mar 3 '11 at 9:23

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