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I have a database with the following info:

table reports: 166211 records
table report_content: 166211 records
table companies: 13188 records

This query takes 41.7324 sec to process:

select rc.* from `reports` r
left join `report_content` rc on rc.`report`=r.`id`
left join `companies` c on c.`id`=r.`company`
where not isnull(r.`published`) and not r.`deleted`
order by rc.`company` asc
limit 50

Where as this query takes 1.6146 sec to process:
I added and rc.company != ''

select rc.* from `reports` r
left join `report_content` rc on rc.`report`=r.`id`
left join `companies` c on c.`id`=r.`company`
where not isnull(r.`published`) and not r.`deleted`
and rc.`company` != ''
order by rc.`company` asc
limit 50

I have fulltext index on rc.company with a cardinality of 11872 all other clause/join fields have btree indexes (mostly primary)

Why is this so? Should i be using a fulltext/btree index on a varchar(255)? The idea is to not have the rc.company != ''

FYI, the tables are MyISAM

note: The added condition doesn't change the result, it's merely to add rc.company into the conditions (this speeds up the query) and wonder if it is elegant?


Update: Thanks Frail, here are the results:

Query A:

1   SIMPLE  r   range   published   published   9   NULL    156085  Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort
1   SIMPLE  rc  ref     report  report  4   database.r.id   1    
1   SIMPLE  c   eq_ref  PRIMARY     PRIMARY     4   database.r.company  1   Using index

Query B:

1   SIMPLE  rc  ALL     report,company  NULL    NULL    NULL    166339  Using where; Using filesort
1   SIMPLE  r   eq_ref  PRIMARY,published   PRIMARY     4   database.rc.report  1   Using where
1   SIMPLE  c   eq_ref  PRIMARY     PRIMARY     4   database.r.company  1   Using index
share|improve this question
    
on every performance question I repeat myself but can you please write "explain" on top of the query and put the result in your question ? –  frail Mar 3 '11 at 10:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As far as I know full-text index is not for sorting. and you are sorting the result with the company column.

Let me try to explain full-text for you simply:

id company
1 "brown fox"
2 "something of fox"

your full-text index would create a btree for the words : "brown, something, fox" so you can match against these words, but as far as I know it wont help you sort.

so if you are using full-text index to get "fox" companies, keep it. but put a btree index on company aswell for sorting purposes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks frail, the searching we will be using will be company like "%abc%", do we use both? Fulltext and BTREE? I have added BTREE aswell as Fulltext, and the query A is still 39 secs vs B at 0.0033 secs... Thanks for all your advice though... –  Prof83 Mar 3 '11 at 11:42
    
to be honest there is no index for "%abc%" queries in mysql. you can't search "thing" over "something". but as on the example I gave you can easily get full words out of full-text index where ever the word is. if you really need partition of words you should check out a search engine like sphinx. –  frail Mar 3 '11 at 11:48
    
Thanks again for all the advice, we're not too concerned for partitioning words... we're more concerned for performance, it seems we'll just stick with adding a pointless condition to speed up the query (including the sort index) for now. But thanks again :) –  Prof83 Mar 3 '11 at 11:57

You haven't listed your table indexes but try creating the following 3 indexes

on the reports table (published,deleted,company,id)
on the report_content table (report,company)
on the companies table (id)

share|improve this answer
    
As I said: I have fulltext index on rc.company with a cardinality of 11872 all other clause/join fields have btree indexes (mostly primary) –  Prof83 Mar 3 '11 at 9:54

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