Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let me just preface by saying it's actually my crappy code that's leaking and crashing my browser, I just thought I better make the languages being used as clear as I could from the outset.

I have a test page here and the javascript can be found here. My problem is that when I try and drag and drop either one of the red pieces more than a few times it sucks up all browser resources and crashes the browser. I'm fairly certain the culprit is something in the following function in the Tracker() object but I'm absolutely stuck on how to debug this.

My current most likely culprit:

  function register_draggable(ob) {
      ob.config.jqId.draggable({cursor: 'move',
                              grid:[ob.config.size, ob.config.size],
                              containment: '#chessboard',
                              revert: 'invalid',
                              start: function() {
                                check_allowable_moves(ob.config.jqLocation,
                                                      ob.config.jqId,
                                                      ob);
                              },
                              stop: function() {
                                remove_allowable_moves();
                              }
                            });
  }

If anyone could take a quick look and give me any suggestions on what I should be looking for, it would be enormously appreciated.

Solution Turns out register_draggable() was the culprit. I registered a new draggable every time the location of a piece updated and all those draggables on the same object were doing nasty things. Currently I now explicity destroy the old draggable before creating a new one. Current code is

    function register_draggable(ob) {
    ob.config.jqId.draggable('destroy');
    ob.config.jqId.draggable({cursor: 'move',
                              grid:[ob.config.size, ob.config.size],
                              containment: '#chessboard',
                              revert: 'invalid',
                              start: function() {
                                check_allowable_moves(ob.config.jqLocation, 
                                                      ob.config.jqId, 
                                                      ob);
                              },
                              stop: function() {
                                remove_allowable_moves();
                              }
                            });
  }
share|improve this question
    
Have check_allowable_moves return immediately, my guess is it's in there. –  Diodeus Feb 5 '09 at 20:52
    
wow, yes it def is leaking memory or something it crashed my browser after 5 moves. My guess is that check_allowable_moves may have something to do with it also. –  bendewey Feb 5 '09 at 20:55
    
Call check_allowable_moves in a test script without any of the drag, drop stuff. See how it behaves. –  Diodeus Feb 5 '09 at 20:58
    
It's almost certainly something about adding the draggable too many times I think. If I put ob.config.jqId.draggable('destroy'); as the first line of register_draggable(ob) it works much better –  Steerpike Feb 5 '09 at 21:01
    
this seems really familiar... –  annakata Feb 6 '09 at 9:13
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't think this is actually your problem, but it seems like your making an extra method call on register and check_ allowable_moves

return {
        register_map: function(ob) { map = ob; },
        register_piece: function(ob) {
          ob.config.tracker = this;
          register_draggable(ob);
        },
        register_draggable: function(ob) { register_draggable(ob); },
        check_allowable_moves: function(location, jqPiece, ob) { check_allowable_moves(location, jqPiece, ob); }
      }

can be shortened to

return {
        register_map: function(ob) { map = ob; },
        register_piece: function(ob) {
          ob.config.tracker = this;
          register_draggable(ob);
        },
        register_draggable: register_draggable,
        check_allowable_moves: check_allowable_moves
      }

Also

you are doing a double lookup here:

function remove_allowable_moves() {
        $('.allowable').droppable('destroy');
        $('.allowable').removeClass('allowable');
      }

should be

function remove_allowable_moves() {
        $('.allowable').droppable('destroy')
          .removeClass('allowable');
      }

Also

Whats the purpose of parsing and int into a float? Take off the parseFloat.

var x = parseInt(locs[1]);
var y = parseInt(locs[2]);
var x_min = parseFloat(x)-2;
var y_min = parseFloat(y)-2;

Finally

Why are you re-registering as draggable on drop? This could be the culprit, if your registering the draggable multiple times and only destroying it once.

jqCell.droppable({ accept: '#'+jqPiece.attr('id'),
                  drop: function(ev, ui) {
                    ob.config.jqLocation = $(this);
                    register_draggable(ob);  // why this?
                  }
                });

Other thoughts

Another thing I don't know if its going to help your performance, but it could clean up your code. the jquery selector allows commas so instead of

$('#coord-1-1').doStuff();
$('#coord-1-2').doStuff();
$('#coord-1-3').doStuff();

you could do

$('#coord-1-1, #coord-1-2, #coord-1-3').doStuff();

so your loop would only be concerned with generating the selector string and then you could run you operation on the entire set.

IMO a cleaner init

instead of

var map = new Map('content');
var piece1 = new Piece(map);
var piece2 = new Piece(map);
var tracker = new Tracker;
tracker.register_map(map);
map.render();
piece1.render('coord-4-4', '1');
piece2.render('coord-1-1', '2');
tracker.register_piece(piece1);
tracker.register_piece(piece2);

I'd like to see

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#content').MapGame({
    	pieces : { '1' : 'coord-4-4', '2' : 'coord-1-1' }
    });
});

Now implementing that is a strech from what you have now, but when building a component for jQuery I like to start with a simple init and work from their. Thats one of the big goals of jQuery is to hide all the junk from the user and just let them spin up and instance of your plugin easily.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, the chaining and parseFloat removal work great, just some code sloppiness left over from a much earlier iteration of this code. The shortening of methods calls made the allowable moves classes stop working so I put them back in. –  Steerpike Feb 5 '09 at 21:16
    
I'm registering the draggable more than once because it needs to be updated with its new location each move. You're right though, it was certainly the culprit. I destroyed the old draggable before creating a new one each time and that helps a lot. –  Steerpike Feb 5 '09 at 21:17
    
Great, I'm glad that helped, so where are we? –  bendewey Feb 5 '09 at 21:29
    
There is something else going on with not shortening the method calls. I've never seen the technique of returning a new object with the methods like that. If you really want to stick the jQuery guidlines you might want to review docs.jquery.com/Plugins/Authoring –  bendewey Feb 5 '09 at 21:32
    
I'm just going to leave the code to destroy the draggable before recreating it in there for now and move onto another problem. Feels like a bit of a hack, but currently I just want a working prototype of this idea up and running before I go back and figure out better ways to do everything. –  Steerpike Feb 5 '09 at 21:33
show 2 more comments

It feels like some event-handlers are registered multiple times, but I'm unsure. (Reason below.)


That doesn't answer the question, but you absolutely should put as much code outside of $(document).ready(…) as possible, in no case put all your code in there as you do now.

I fear that your code is so ineligible that it's too much work to understand it. Could you restructure it (All those function-in-function are really horrible to read.) and add some comments.

Maybe it's just me, but I find it too hard to read and understand. It's surely going to be a disaster to maintain.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry it's hard for you to read, I tend to use a combination of styles stolen from wait-till-i.com/2008/05/23/script-configuration and peter.michaux.ca/articles/how-i-write-javascript-widgets to write my javascript objects. –  Steerpike Feb 5 '09 at 21:20
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.