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I want to do this substitution in a set of files :

replace :

KEY
KEY1|VAL1
KEY
KEY2|VAL2

by :

KEY
KEY1|VAL1

Eg :

KEY
KEY|sde
KEY
KEY|45g

by

KEY
KEY|sde

In short, I need to remove the second occurence of KEY \n KEY|VAL pair.. I am not good at using sed, please help.. It's urgent..

Thanks a lot,

Trinity

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1  
sed has some multi-line capabilities, but I suspect you expect too much of it for your task. If your input is very regular, e.g. each KEY repeats exactly twice, and have one KEYx/VALx following it, it is simple, but depending on clarifications from you, you might need to look into awk or a 'proper' scripting language for your solution. –  Chen Levy Mar 3 '11 at 9:28
    
they repeat exactly twice –  trinity Mar 3 '11 at 10:05

4 Answers 4

If I understand your problem correctly (and I might not), this is one solution:

sed -ne '/^KEY$/{p;n;p;n;n}' file

Explanation:

When finding KEY in a line by itself:

  • p - print the line
  • n;p - go to the next line and print it too.
  • n;n - skip the next 2 lines.

... and repeat.

Edit (explanation continued):

  • The -n tell sed not to print a line unless explicitly directed to do so (with p).
  • The -e is not strictly required here. It says the following string is a sed expression.
share|improve this answer
    
wow, yes thats exactly my need ! :) what 's -ne for.. –  trinity Mar 3 '11 at 10:21
    
how do i do this inline ? –  trinity Mar 3 '11 at 10:31
    
Non-standard -i command line option works on most flavours of sed for inline operations. –  mouviciel Mar 3 '11 at 10:48

sed -e 'N;/key2\|val2/ d' your_file.txt should do the trick, note the \ is to quote the | otherwise your shell might interprete the command wrongly.

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please see my edit in the question, the val2 - is actually a variable –  trinity Mar 3 '11 at 10:06
1  
That's not why the | is escaped (the single quotes already do that. The reason is that in BREs a pipe is a literal character unless it's escaped. In EREs (sed -r), you don't need to escape it. Since in this instance you want to match a literal pipe character and you're using BREs, you should not escape it. –  Dennis Williamson Mar 3 '11 at 16:03
    
Thanks for pointing that out, always good to learn something :-) –  Bernhard Mar 19 '11 at 11:24

you can try using awk. Note, only the 2nd instance of your required pattern is changed.

# cat file
KEY
KEY1|VAL1
blah
blah
KEY
KEY2|VAL2
junk
junk
KEY
KEY3|VAL3
KEY
KEY4|VAL4
KEY
KEY5|VAL5

$ awk '/^KEY$/&&!f&&!x{s=$0;getline;s=s"\n"$0;f=1;print s;next}f&&/^KEY$/{print s;getline;x=1;f=0;next}1' file
KEY
KEY1|VAL1
blah
blah
KEY
KEY1|VAL1
junk
junk
KEY
KEY3|VAL3
KEY
KEY4|VAL4
KEY
KEY5|VAL5
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Is it a problem if you use other tools also? I just tried:

sort "file" | uniq | sed '/KEY2/d'

You can even emulate uniq using sed, check: http://sed.sourceforge.net/sed1line.txt

Hope that helps

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1  
this would completely alter the file content, i guess that's not intended –  Bernhard Mar 3 '11 at 9:33

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