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How can I run my windows service once in 12 weeks? I implemented it using timers, and I am assigning the timer interval as (12*7*24*60*60*1000 milliseconds). Is there any issue if i use the timer for such a duration (12*7*24*60*60*1000 milliseconds).

If it causes an issue please suggest an alternate way to run my windows service once in every 12 weeks.

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What is the significance of ASP.Net in this question? Tag also? –  Anuraj Mar 3 '11 at 9:53
    
How likely is it that the server will be rebooted for e.g. automated updates? As others have said, for a time interval this long, you're better using a scheduler. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 3 '11 at 9:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the better approach will be comparing dates.

  1. Create a Windows service with timer with one hour interval.
  2. In the onstart event of the service store the current date.
  3. In the timer_tick / elapsed event, check the difference between current date and stored date, if it is 12 do operations. Also update the current date.
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Thank for your reply... –  Harun Mar 3 '11 at 11:10

Well, yes it would cause issues. Int32.MaxValue is 2,147,483,647.

Can't you just schedule your service to run once in 12 weeks? You can use

net start yourservice
net stop yourservice

(as per sajoshi's comment: I meant you can start and stop your service with Task Scheduler)

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You can use Windows Task Scheduler to achieve this... –  sajoshi Mar 3 '11 at 9:52

You should be using the windows task scheduler for this kind of thing. You can set it to start any application (not windows service) are various intervals.

Besides, why have an application running on a server using up memory and cpu cycles whne you only need it once every 12 week!

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