Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following code:

#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>

class Foo : public std::stringstream {
public:
    ~Foo() { std::cout << str(); }
};

int main()
{
    Foo foo;
    foo << "Test1" << std::endl;

    Foo() << "Test2" << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

When I execute this, it gives me:

004177FC
Test1

I do not understand why the second example gives me gibberish. The temporary should live until the entire expression is evaluated, so why does it not behave the same as the first example?

share|improve this question
    
compiler? platform? –  CashCow Mar 3 '11 at 11:33
    
I do not think that the problem is with the lifetime of the temporary. From assembler I can see that it is choosing std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >::operator<<(void const*) over the char const * taking operator. I cannot explain it at all. I do not see why the void const * accepting operator would be a better match than the char const * accepting operator. MSVC 2010 prints both strings but I guess that could be because of some extension rather than it being more conforming. –  wilx Mar 3 '11 at 12:16
    
@wilx I have answered why it possibly happens: this is a case where external overloading (not class member) and internal (class member) do make a real difference. –  CashCow Mar 3 '11 at 12:20
    
@CashCow: You are totally right, I have made a testcase but I have failed to reproduce the problem. This was because I have included member operator(char const*) which was wrong. The standard class does not have it. –  wilx Mar 3 '11 at 12:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I tested it.

I can guess that operator<< cannot bind a temporary to a non-const reference, so any externally defined operator<< functions will not work on the Foo temporary, but any class member ones will so if ostream or ostringstream has any internal operator<< members they will work.

Therefore it may be that the overload to a pointer is a member function whilst the special one for const char * is externally declared.

The non-temporary can bind to the non-const reference for the more specialist overload.

If you really need this you can workaround with a wrapper

class Foo :
{
    mutable std::ostringstream oss;
public:
  ~Foo()
  {
    std::cout << oss.str();
  }

  template<typename T>
  std::ostream&
  operator<<( const T& t ) const
  {
      return oss << t;
  }
};

Tested and works. The first operator<< will return you the underlying stream.

I tried this too but it coredumped:

class Foo : std::ostringstream
{
    Foo & nonconstref;
public:
   Foo() : nonconstref( *this ) {}
  ~Foo()
  {
    std::cout << str();
  }

  template<typename T>
  std::ostream&
  operator<<( const T& t ) const
  {
      return nonconstref << t;
  }
};

This also works:

class Foo : public std::ostringstream
{
public:
   Foo()  {}
  ~Foo()
  {
    std::cout << str();
  }

  Foo& ncref()
  {
       return *this;
  }
};

int main()
{
    Foo foo;
    foo << "Test1" << std::endl;

    Foo().ncref() << "Test2" << std::endl;

}
share|improve this answer
2  
Been there, done that, confirming. I also came up with workaround—just do std::stringstream().flush() << "anything";. The trick is, that flush() does nothing on a stringstream, but returns invocant via reference. On a side-note, since the operator<< returns just std::ostream, you'll have to static_cast it back to stringstream to get the result out of it. –  Jan Hudec Mar 3 '11 at 11:52
    
I got another solution that doesn't call flush, but yes for a stringstream flushing is a no-op so works in this case. –  CashCow Mar 3 '11 at 12:19
    
That is a nasty problem, thanks for the explanation. Your first solution is not an option, because the template for operator<< will not work for std::endl - this was the reason why I tried using inheritance. I guess I will go with the last solution. –  Björn Pollex Mar 3 '11 at 14:09
    
The upcoming C++0x will solve this problem with an extra operator<< overload that takes an rvalue reference and returns an lvalue reference. Then the flush() trick will not be needed anymore. –  Bo Persson Mar 3 '11 at 16:53
    
operator<< returns ostream& so assuming you stream at least one thing before your endl it will definitely work. I can't see offhand why it wouldn't work with endl anyway, as it just forwards what is a pointer to a function to its internal stream. –  CashCow Jul 3 '14 at 12:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.