Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a number of classes doing different things but using the same Singleton pattern from http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/singleton.html

public sealed class Singleton
{
static Singleton instance=null;
static readonly object padlock = new object();

Singleton()
{
}

public static Singleton Instance
{
    get
    {
        lock (padlock)
        {
            if (instance==null)
            {
                instance = new Singleton();
            }
            return instance;
        }
    }
}
}

Does anyone have a neat way I can reuse as much of the common Singleton code as possible between the different classes?

For example if I have SingletonJob1 and SingletonJob2 I'd like to be able to change the code in only place if I move to one of the other Singleton patterns.

Edit: Yes as people have pointed out Method 5 from http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/singleton.html is less code. I did read to the end of the page! I chose method 2 because the Singleton objects relate to hardware devices and I want only want a couple of them initialised and used in any given run of the program. Method 5 will initialise them all straight away.

share|improve this question
1  
what you mean reuse? implement other singletons? –  Sergey Vedernikov Mar 3 '11 at 11:08
4  
Use a Generic Singleton –  Tokk Mar 3 '11 at 11:08
2  
When looking at that page, did you note that the 4th/5th versions are preferred? This is the 2nd version... In particular with the 4th version there is so little code that it simply doesn't hurt to duplicate it. –  Marc Gravell Mar 3 '11 at 11:08
2  
Highly related: stackoverflow.com/questions/380755/a-generic-singleton –  cwap Mar 3 '11 at 11:08
2  
@dig, programmers should shoot themselves that day when Singletone will become a snippet. Use IoC, get rid of singletons written in this way. –  Snowbear Mar 3 '11 at 11:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is there any reason you're using that version rather than the simpler one which just initializes the instance in the declaration?

public class Singleton
{
    private static Singleton instance = new Singleton();
    public static Singleton Instance { get { return instance; } }

    // Only use this if you really need it - see the page for details
    static Singleton() {}

    private Singleton()
    {
        // I assume this logic varies
    }
}

This pattern is sufficiently short that I don't think it's much of a problem to include it everywhere.

I would urge you to consider whether you really need that many singletons; they're generally not great for testability etc.

EDIT: If you really, really want laziness and you're using .NET 4, you can get it with the 6th pattern which is on the singleton page's new home:

public sealed class Singleton
{
    private static readonly Lazy<Singleton> lazy =
        new Lazy<Singleton>(() => new Singleton());

    public static Singleton Instance { get { return lazy.Value; } }

    private Singleton()
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
"see the page for details" ? –  Guillaume Mar 3 '11 at 11:18
    
Thanks for your answer Jon but I don't want them all initialised when the code first runs which happens in method 5. Method 2 provides more control in that area. –  richard druce Mar 3 '11 at 11:23
1  
@Richard: Don't forget it'll only run this when this type is first used. Are you really using the rest of the type without using an instance of it? –  Jon Skeet Mar 3 '11 at 11:37
    
@Guillaume: The page that was referenced in the question. –  Jon Skeet Mar 3 '11 at 11:38
    
thanks I hadn't seen the new page. –  richard druce Mar 3 '11 at 11:41
public static class Singleton<T>  where T: new()
{

static T instance=null;
static readonly object padlock = new object();

public static T Instance
{
    get
    {
        lock (padlock)
        {
            if (instance==null)
            {
                instance = new T();
            }
            return instance;
        }
    }
}

}

So you can use your Singleton for all Classes:

Singleton<YourClass>.Instance.YourMethod();
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that is what he wanted, but is close –  mrnye Mar 3 '11 at 11:13
2  
At that point, YourClass has to have a public parameterless constructor, which means it's not really a singleton. –  Jon Skeet Mar 3 '11 at 11:13
    
it should be "static T instance=default(T);" or "public static class Singleton<T> where T:class,new()" to avoid errors –  PVitt Mar 3 '11 at 11:14

Something like this?

public sealed class Singleton<T>
{
static T instance=null;
static readonly object padlock = new object();
static Func<T> createInstance;

Singleton(Func<T> constructor)
{
   createInstance = constructor;
}

public static T Instance
{
    get
    {
        lock (padlock)
        {
            if (instance==null)
            {
                instance = createInstance();
            }
            return instance;
        }
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
And how does that make it a singleton? simply: it doesn't. –  Marc Gravell Mar 3 '11 at 11:14
    
yeah, I wrote it quite quickly, and it just felt wrong. –  Massif Mar 3 '11 at 11:26

I believe this is what you are after. However I strongly recommend avoiding this Singleton (capital S) pattern as it crushes all unit testing souls and makes heaps of things difficult to control.

public class Singleton<T> where T : new()
{
  private static T _Instance;
  private static readonly object _InstanceLock = new object();

  public static T Instance
  {
    get
    {
      if (_Instance == null)
      {
        lock (_InstanceLock)
        {
          if (_Instance == null)
          {
            _Instance = new T();
          }
        }
      }
      return _Instance;
    }
  }

}

public class Foo : Singleton<Foo>
{
  public void Something()
  {
  }
}

public class Example
{
  public static void Main()
  {
    Foo.Instance.Something();
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Unit testing? What's that? Joking but thanks for your advice. –  richard druce Mar 3 '11 at 11:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.