Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any way in SQL Server of determining what a character in a code page would represent without actually creating a test database of that collation?

Example. If I create a test database with collation SQL_Ukrainian_CP1251_CS_AS and then do CHAR(255) it returns я.

If I try the following on a database with SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CS_AS collation however

SELECT CHAR(255) COLLATE SQL_Ukrainian_CP1251_CS_AS

It returns y

SELECT CHAR(255)

Returns ÿ so it is obviously going first via the database's default collation then trying to find the closest equivalent to that in the explicit collation. Can this be avoided?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

While MS SQL supports both code pages and Unicode unhelpfully it doesn't provide any functions to convert between the two so figuring out what character is represented by a value in a different code page is a pig.

There are two potential methods I've seen to handle conversions, one is detailed here http://www.codeguru.com/cpp/data/data-misc/values/article.php/c4571 and involves bolting a custom conversion program onto the database and using that for conversions.

The other is to construct a db table consisting of

[CodePage], [ANSI Value], [UnicodeValue]

with the unicode value stored as either the int representing the unicode character to be converted using nchar()or the nchar itself

Your using the collation SQL_Ukrainian_CP1251_CS_AS which is code page 1251 (CP1251 from the centre of the string). You can grab its translation table here http://unicode.org/Public/MAPPINGS/VENDORS/MICSFT/WINDOWS/CP1251.TXT

Its a TSV so after trimming the top off the raw data should import fairly cleanly.

Personally I'd lean more towards the latter than the former especially for a production server as the former may introduce instability.

share|improve this answer

Actually I have found an answer to my question now. A bit clunky but does the job unless there's a better way out there?

SET NOCOUNT ON;

CREATE TABLE #Collations
(
     code TINYINT PRIMARY KEY
);

WITH E00(N) AS (SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1),   --2
        E02(N) AS (SELECT 1 FROM E00 a, E00 b), --4
        E04(N) AS (SELECT 1 FROM E02 a, E02 b), --16
        E08(N) AS (SELECT 1 FROM E04 a, E04 b) --256
INSERT INTO #Collations
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY (SELECT 0)) - 1
FROM E08    

DECLARE @AlterScript NVARCHAR(MAX) = ''

SELECT @AlterScript = @AlterScript + ' 
RAISERROR(''Processing' + name + ''',0,1) WITH NOWAIT;
ALTER TABLE #Collations ADD ' + name + ' CHAR(1) COLLATE ' + name + ';
EXEC(''UPDATE #Collations SET ' + name + '=CAST(code AS BINARY(1))'');
EXEC(''UPDATE #Collations SET ' + name + '=NULL WHERE ASCII(' + name + ') <> code'');
'
FROM   sys.fn_helpcollations()
WHERE  name LIKE '%CS_AS'
       AND name NOT IN    /*Unicode Only Collations*/
                        ( 'Assamese_100_CS_AS', 'Bengali_100_CS_AS',
                         'Divehi_90_CS_AS', 'Divehi_100_CS_AS' ,
                         'Indic_General_90_CS_AS', 'Indic_General_100_CS_AS',
                             'Khmer_100_CS_AS', 'Lao_100_CS_AS',
                         'Maltese_100_CS_AS', 'Maori_100_CS_AS',
                         'Nepali_100_CS_AS', 'Pashto_100_CS_AS',
                         'Syriac_90_CS_AS', 'Syriac_100_CS_AS',
                         'Tibetan_100_CS_AS' )


EXEC (@AlterScript)

SELECT * FROM #Collations

DROP TABLE #Collations
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.