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Say I have three lists: a={1,5,10,15} b={2,4,6,8} and c={1,1,0,1,0}. I want a plot which has a as the x axis, b as the y axis and a red/black dot to mark 1/0. For. e.g. The coordinate (5,4) will have a red dot.
In other words the coordinate (a[i],b[i]) will have a red/black dot depending on whether c[i] is 1 or 0.
I have been trying my hand with ListPlot but can't figure out the options.

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1  
I'd like to point out that this is a general problem in mma. Often I have a set of data points that I'd like to plot differently depending on some 3rd, or 4th, bit of data. ErrorListPlot does this, but it is too specialized and it would be nice to specify functions that supply graphics primitives based upon the auxillary data. I know that Mark Caprio is working on something like that for the LevelScheme packages, so I'll have to show him this question. –  rcollyer Mar 3 '11 at 18:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I suggest this.

a = {1, 5, 10, 15};
b = {2, 4, 6, 8};
c = {1, 1, 0, 1};

Graphics[
  {#, Point@{##2}} & @@@ 
    Thread@{c /. {1 -> Red, 0 -> Black}, a, b},
  Axes -> True, AxesOrigin -> 0
]

Mathematica graphics

Or shorter but more obfuscated

Graphics[
  {Hue[1, 1, #], Point@{##2}} & @@@ Thread@{c, a, b}, 
  Axes -> True, AxesOrigin -> 0
]
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+1, I like this one the best as it melds the three lists together with a clever use of Apply (@@@), SlotSequence (##2), Thread, and ReplaceAll (/.). (The use of SlotSequence alone would have merited the +1.) The other answers require additional work to set and combine the color list with the coords from a and b. –  rcollyer Mar 3 '11 at 16:29
    
@Mr.Wizard. Very nice! –  TomD Mar 3 '11 at 16:47
    
Thank you. I hope that skr finds it intelligible. –  Mr.Wizard Mar 3 '11 at 16:56
    
Very elegant! I like how Thread did the work of two Transpose[] (in my code below). Also, the SlotSequence was something I wouldn't have thought of (before seeing your example). –  David Carraher Mar 3 '11 at 23:56
    
+1 Very cool solution - nothing extraneous, everything is here because it has to be. –  Leonid Shifrin Mar 4 '11 at 12:44

Leonid's idea, perhaps more naive.

f[a_, b_, c_] := 
 ListPlot[Pick[Transpose[{a, b}], c, #] & /@ {0, 1}, 
       PlotStyle -> {PointSize[Large], {Blue, Red}}]

f[a, b, c] 

enter image description here

Edit: Just for fun

f[h_, a_, b_, c_, opt___] := 
 h[Pick[Transpose[{a, b}], c, #] & /@ {0, 1}, 
  PlotStyle -> {PointSize[Large], {Blue, Red}}, opt]  

f[ ListPlot, 
   Sort@RandomReal[1, 100], 
   Sin[(2 \[Pi] #)/100] + RandomReal[#/100] & /@ Range[100], 
   RandomInteger[1, 100], 
      Joined -> True, 
      InterpolationOrder -> 2, 
      Filling -> Axis]

enter image description here

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I like that. :-) What is the purpose of Directive? –  Mr.Wizard Mar 3 '11 at 18:05
    
+1, interesting take. –  rcollyer Mar 3 '11 at 18:10
    
@Mr. What Directive? er... :D –  belisarius Mar 3 '11 at 18:12
    
+1, pretty cool. –  Leonid Shifrin Mar 3 '11 at 18:25

Here are your points:

a = {1, 5, 10, 15};
b = {2, 4, 6, 8};
c = {1, 1, 0, 1};

(I deleted the last element from c to make it the same length as a and b). What I'd suggest is to separately make images for points with zeros and ones and then combine them - this seems easiest in this situation:

showPoints[a_, b_, c_] :=
With[{coords = Transpose[{a, b}]},
   With[{plotF = ListPlot[Pick[coords, c, #], PlotMarkers -> Automatic, PlotStyle -> #2] &},
     Show[MapThread[plotF, {{0, 1}, {Black, Red}}]]]]

Here is the usage:

showPoints[a, b, c]

enter image description here

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+1, for Pick, as I've never had a use for it. –  rcollyer Mar 3 '11 at 16:30
    
+1 Ha! I looked late at your answer ... after doing the same. Almost post it to my shame :) –  belisarius Mar 3 '11 at 17:13
    
@belisarius There were a couple of times when I was in the same situation w.r.t. your answers, so we are even now :). But, seriously, for this one, I liked some other answers more than mine. –  Leonid Shifrin Mar 3 '11 at 17:19
    
@Leonid Perhaps other answers are more concise and clean, but I thought ListPlot as the "natural" way to go, just because you could use ListLinePlot with all its options after that. –  belisarius Mar 3 '11 at 17:27
    
@belisarius My (perhaps unconscious) motivation for choosing this construct was that it is high-level, that is, completely independent of the internal representation of points. Should that change at some point (pun unintended), the construct we used is the one most likely to survive. But, it won't win the succinctness contest. Perhaps, your motivation was similar? –  Leonid Shifrin Mar 3 '11 at 17:32

One possibility:

ListPlot[List /@ Transpose[{a, b}], 
 PlotMarkers -> {1, 1, 0, 1} /. {1 -> { Style[\[FilledCircle], Red], 10}, 
   0 -> { { Style[\[FilledCircle], Black], 10}}}, 
 AxesOrigin -> {0, 0}]

Giving as output:

enter image description here

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+1, for convincing ListPlot to do you your work using PlotMarkers. –  rcollyer Mar 3 '11 at 16:32

You could obtain similar results (to those of Leonid) using Graphics:

    Graphics[{PointSize[.02], Transpose[{(c/. {1 -> Red, 0 -> Black}), 
              Point /@ Transpose[{a, b}]}]},
              Axes -> True, AxesOrigin -> {0, 0}]

Using Graphics instead of ListPlot

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