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I try to handle the output of different runnables wihtin another thread. First I add all runnables to a set and try to trigger their progress, which is saved into a map toether with the category. The category is the identifier for each runnable. There can exist only one runnable per category.

After that I try to write out the output in a progress bar on the stdout. But it is empty (0%) everytime. The strange thing is, when I am debugging in Eclipse, step by step, the progress bar seems to work correctly. I cannot find the problem, maybe it's some timing problem, or something else. Can some tell what I am doing wrong?

If someone knows a better way of handling the output of different Threads, please let me know. I am would be happy, definitely.

Thanks in advance for your help.

This is my WriterThread:

public class WriterT extends Thread {

Set<Runnable> my_runnables = new HashSet<Runnable>();
Map<String, Integer> all_runnable_progress = new HashMap<String, Integer>();

public WriterT() {

}


public void add(Runnable r) {
    my_runnables.add(r);
}


public void run() {

    if(!my_runnables.isEmpty()) {

        int progress = 0;

        while(true) {
            for(Runnable r : my_runnables) {
                if(r instanceof Verify_TestRun) {
                    Verify_TestRun run = (Verify_TestRun)r;
                    progress = run.get_progress();
                    all_runnable_progress.put(run.get_category(), progress);
                }
            }

            if(progress <= 100) {
                print_progress();
            } else {
                break;
            }

            try {
                Thread.sleep(150);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}


private void print_progress() {

    StringBuilder str_builder = new StringBuilder();

    for(String cat : all_runnable_progress.keySet()) {

        int percent = all_runnable_progress.get(cat);

        str_builder.append(cat + "\t[");
        for(int i = 0; i < 25; i++){
            if( i < (percent/4)){
                str_builder.append("=");
            }else{
                str_builder.append(" ");
            }
        }

        str_builder.append("] " + percent + "%" + "\t");
    }

    System.out.print("\r" + str_builder.toString());
}

}

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Updated answer after new information

So if I understand you correctly, you want to go over each test run you are tracking, see if any of them is still running i.e. the progress is less than 100 and print the progress as long as they're not all finished.

First, you need to consider what Stephen C said in his answer - you (probably) want to sum up the progress values of each of the test runs. Then, check if the sum comes out to less than 100 for each test run. If it does, at least 1 test run is still in progress and you print progress and stay in your loop. If you find that your sum comes out to exactly 100 for each test run, then you're all done. You print progress one final time to update the output to reflect 100% for each and then break from the loop.

Here is my suggested implementation that makes minor changes to your code:

public void run() {
    if(!my_runnables.isEmpty()) {

        int progress = 0;

        while(true) {
            for(Runnable r : my_runnables) {
                if(r instanceof Verify_TestRun) {
                    Verify_TestRun run = (Verify_TestRun)r;
                    //change #1 - sum up the progress value of each test
                    progress += run.get_progress();
                    all_runnable_progress.put(run.get_category(), progress);
                }
            }

            //change #2 - break when all done
            if(progress < (100 * my_runnables.size()) ) { 
                //check if tests are still running i.e. there are test runs with progress < 100
                print_progress();
            } else {
                //otherwise print one last status (to update all status' to 100%) before stopping the loop
                print_progress();
                break;
            }

            try {
                Thread.sleep(150);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}

Shouldn't progress be checked within the for loop? What you're doing right now is iterating over all your Runnables and setting progress to the progress value and adding it to the map. But then you immediately move on to the next Runnable. The net result is that the value of progress once you leave the loop is the value of the last Runnable you handled.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, for your answer. I think I didn't explain well. Every Verify_TestRun (which implements Runnable) has a private field called category, so every Runnable has this category value as it's identifier. So after the for-loop, there should be, let's say 3 entries in the Map<String,Integer>, one for every category/Runnable. And after the for-loop I try to print out the values at that moment by calling print_progress(). – nyyrikki Mar 3 '11 at 16:33
    
@nyyrikki If this still isn't what you need then I'm afraid you need to clarify your question further. And please take note of Stephen C's suggestion about names - Java uses camel-case for names with certain suggestions for when to begin with a capital letter and when to begin with a lowercase letter. You'll rarely find words separated by an underscore (_), instead capitalize the letter that begins the next word. So printProgress() not print_progress() and allRunnableProgress instead of all_runnable_progress etc. You can read more about Java code conventions – no.good.at.coding Mar 3 '11 at 20:32
    
I am somehow used to this 'bad style' but should be no problem to change that. Tomorrow I am again working on that problem. – nyyrikki Mar 3 '11 at 20:40
    
Sorry, I understand that I can't explain it well enough. Will try, the my VerifyTestRun Class implements the Runnable and processes through a bunch of files. So in every Runnable I calculate the actual progress by doing something like that progress = (howManyFilesDone/AllFiles)*100;. So in the output thread (WritertT) I want to get that progress by calling getProgress(). Somehow I think, I will just change the method of obtaining the Runnables. But what would be a good implementation? – nyyrikki Mar 3 '11 at 20:55

I think that this might be the problem line:

progress = run.get_progress();

Given the context, progress will end up as the last value returned by a Verify_RunTest, but I suspect you mean it to be the sum of the values.

(BTW - Verify_RunTest is bad style. It should be VerifyRunTest.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks again for your help, I think you helped me out yesterday too. Please check the next comment. – nyyrikki Mar 3 '11 at 16:36
    
uiuiui, now I know what you mean. Didn't see that until now. But that's not causing the problem, but of course I have to fix that. – nyyrikki Mar 3 '11 at 17:46

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