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Data: (log_time is a DATETIME type)

log_id  | action      | log_time            | user
--------------------------------------------------
1         Processed     2011-02-28 16:38:48   1
2         Processed     2011-03-02 16:56:43   5
3         Processed     2011-03-02 17:00:17   5
4         Processed     2011-03-03 08:59:33   5

Query:

SELECT log_time, user 
FROM logs
WHERE action = "Processed"
GROUP BY action 
HAVING MAX(log_time)

Result:

log_time            | user
--------------------------
2011-02-28 16:38:48   1

Clearly, this is not having the max log_time at all. If I change the query to...

SELECT MAX(log_time), user 
FROM logs 
WHERE action = "Processed" 

Then I get, naturally:

log_time            | user
--------------------------
2011-03-03 08:59:33   1

Now, the data I obviously want is the data in row 4: March 3, but user 5. I understand that I can get this by doing a simple SELECT ... ORDER BY log_time DESC LIMIT 1. But my question is, what am I doing with these MAX() queries that isn't correct? It would seem to me that if I ran a query with a HAVING MAX() that it would give me the row that, well, had the max. What am I not understanding about how MAX() works?

Edit: To elaborate my question, basically, when I see a query...

SELECT * FROM logs WHERE action = "Processed"
GROUP BY action HAVING MAX(log_time)

... my assumption, based on how the code appears is that it will retrieve the row with the largest log_time where action is Processed. This appears to be a faulty assumption. What, then, does HAVING MAX() even mean?

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i think you want to compare with a value rather than use as a boolean: HAVING MAX(log_time) –  Mitch Wheat Mar 3 '11 at 15:24
    
@Mitch Wheat, I don't understand what you mean. Where am I using it as a boolean? –  Andrew Mar 3 '11 at 15:27
1  
From your edit - I too am confused about why MySQL lets you say HAVING MAX(log_time) - most other SQL engines I know of would spit it out. Generally, in a HAVING clause, you'd be expected to compare the result of an aggregate function with something else (e.g. HAVING MAX(Value) = 1 would be reasonable. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 3 '11 at 15:43
    
Hrm. So it's not so much that MAX() operates unexpectedly, it's more like MAX() shouldn't even be used in a HAVING clause. That's irksome. Submit that as an answer and you get the checkmark. :P So basically, if I want the whole row with the highest log_time, the best option really is to do an ORDER BY log_time DESC LIMIT 1, right? –  Andrew Mar 3 '11 at 15:47
    
@Damien_the_Unbeliever, to elaborate on what I think you're saying, and possibly what the first commenter meant... when I say "HAVING MAX(log_time)", that translates to "HAVING 2011-03-03 08:59:33", which translates to "HAVING TRUE". However, when I try swapping it for "HAVING log_time = MAX(log_time)", I get no results. –  Andrew Mar 3 '11 at 15:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on the input of others, particularly Damien_The_Unbeliever, I realized that my problem was that HAVING MAX() doesn't actually do anything. It will just pipe out the date, which doesn't work as it's not being compared to anything.

When I say HAVING MAX(log_time), that translates to HAVING 2011-03-03 08:59:33, which doesn't tell the SQL what it's supposed to have, it's just a statement, like IF (5). I think. HAVING continues to be somewhat of a mystery for me, but I think this is the reason why this particular issue was causing me grief.

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You need to include a GROUP BY clause for the aggregate function.

SELECT MAX(log_time), user 
    FROM logs 
    WHERE action = "Processed" 
    GROUP BY user

OR, if you're looking for a single value, don't include user at all:

SELECT MAX(log_time)
    FROM logs 
    WHERE action = "Processed" 

And finally, if you want the user associated with that single max value, use a subquery

SELECT l.user, l.log_time
    FROM logs l
        INNER JOIN (SELECT MAX(log_time) as max_time
                        FROM logs 
                        WHERE action = "Processed") q
            ON l.log_time = q.max_time
                AND l.action = "Processed"
share|improve this answer
    
The first one gives me two rows, then, one for each user, with their max. Whether I use GROUP BY user or GROUP BY action or both, I get incorrect data. And as for the second one, I do want the whole row of data, because I want to know who did it. –  Andrew Mar 3 '11 at 15:31
    
@Andrew: I've added additional information to my answer to cover your case. –  Joe Stefanelli Mar 3 '11 at 15:33
    
@Joe Stefanelli, just makes me wonder, if MAX() requires all these hoops to jump through then why does it even exist? Am I fundamentally misunderstanding how MAX() works, or is it a purely useless function? –  Andrew Mar 3 '11 at 15:35
    
@Andrew: MAX() is an aggregate function, designed to work across a group of rows. It can work across the whole table, as in my second query, or work across subsets of rows using GROUP BY, as shown in my first query. –  Joe Stefanelli Mar 3 '11 at 15:37
1  
@Andrew: You can find the MAX value for a given column in a single query, but you cannot return the other columns associated with that row without using something like the subquery technique I illustrated. –  Joe Stefanelli Mar 3 '11 at 16:03

The HAVING-clause is used the filter GROUPS that do not meet a certain criteria. The way you have defined the criteria, the "processed"-group DOES match the HAVING clause, since its MAX(log_time) contains the maximum log_time (Or perhaps HAVING MAX(log_time) evaluates to true. Either way, it's a weird statement)...

What your probably want is to SELECT the maximum log_time, in which case the query would be:

SELECT MAX(log_time), user 
FROM logs
WHERE action = "Processed"
GROUP BY action;

Now, the reason you get "1" as user is that the user-column is not part of the GROUP BY clause. This means that MySQL doesn't know which user-row that you want in your output. It could be any of the 4 rows really. So, another way to formulate the question would be:

SELECT logs.user, logs.log_time
FROM logs INNER JOIN 
  (SELECT MAX(log_time) as max, action
   FROM logs
   WHERE action = "Processed"
   GROUP BY action) sub ON logs.log_time = sub.max AND logs.action = sub.action

NOTE: the SQL query that you give as an example is not a valid SQL query according to Standard SQL. It works on mysql, but that's due/thanks to how MySQL has implemented GROUP BY. In standard SQL, the only thing you can select are results of aggregate functions and/or columns mentioned in the GROUP BY clause.

So, in other database systems, you wouldn't be able to select the user-column, since it is not a GROUP BY-column and not the result of an aggregate function. In order for it to be valid Standard SQL, you'd have to write:

SELECT MAX(log_time), user 
FROM logs
WHERE action = "Processed"
GROUP BY action, user -- Create groups based on both action AND user.
                      -- This allows us to SELECT the user column unambigiously.
;
share|improve this answer
SELECT log_time, user 
FROM logs 
WHERE action = "Processed"  && log_time=(select MAX(log_time) from logs)
)

this give the output

2011-03-03 08:59:33 5

share|improve this answer
    
Can't use MAX() in WHERE, only in HAVING. –  Andrew Mar 3 '11 at 15:33
    
Updated the answer,added sub query,i think there should another work around for it,for now its working –  sush Mar 3 '11 at 15:45
    
Then the first MAX(log_time) would seem redundant. Anyway, the point of this question was to find out why MAX() needs a subquery to begin with, not so much to find a use for one. –  Andrew Mar 3 '11 at 15:48

I would order by MAX(log_time) and select the top 1, since the sorting will happen anyway.

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This question is not about how to get the result; as I stated in my question, I know about ordering and limiting. I'm asking why MAX() doesn't work this way, which seems the most intuitive. And if the solution to MAX() is not to use MAX(), what is the point of it? –  Andrew Mar 3 '11 at 15:33

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