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Consider the following Python code:

def f(*args):
    for a in args:
        pass

foo = ['foo', 'bar', 'baz']

# Python generator expressions FTW
gen = (f for f in foo)

f(*gen)

Does *args automatically expand the generator at call-time? Put another way, am I iterating over gen twice within f(*gen), once to expand *args and once to iterate over args? Or is the generator preserved in pristine condition, while iteration only happens once during the for loop?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The generator is expanded at the time of the function call, as you can easily check:

def f(*args):
    print args
foo = ['foo', 'bar', 'baz']
gen = (f for f in foo)
f(*gen)

will print

('foo', 'bar', 'baz')
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Why not look and see what gen is in f()? Add print args as the first line. If it's still a generator object, it'll tell you. I would expect the argument unpacking to turn it into a tuple.

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1  
Whenever you have f(*arg), arg itself will be always be a tuple at the function –  NullUserException Mar 3 '11 at 15:31

Your don't really need

gen = (f for f in foo)

Calling

f(*foo)

will output

('foo', 'bar', 'baz')
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1  
This is just the simplest possible generator, for demonstration purposes--an "identity" generator, if you will. –  David Eyk Dec 11 '12 at 17:41

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