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I got a point with latitude 'x' and longitude 'y' using decimals. The point is centered in a square, the length to each side is 12 meters. How do I find the latitudes and longitudes of each corner of the square? I program in Java, but I appreciate any pseudo-code. :-)

After reading articles on the matter, I guess that a change of 'd'-meters is equal to 'e'-degrees (in decimal)..? If so, what is the "conversion-rate"?

I do not know if this helps, but given that it is 12 meters to each side, each corner has to be 16,97 meters from the point.

In advance, thanks :-)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Store your center point lat/lon, as well as the distance to the corner (use some trig to figure this), and the radius of the earth in meters. Your bearing in degrees will be 45 to give you the top-right, 115 for top-left, and so on. Use the fancy math below to find the lat/long of your desired corner in decimal format. Convert to degrees by multiplying each by 180/PI

lat1 = centerPoint.lat * ( Math.PI / 180 );  //Only do this if you need to convert from deg. to dec.
lon1 = centerPoint.lng * ( Math.PI / 180 );  //Only do this if you need to convert from deg. to dec.
d = distance;
R = EARTHS_RADIUS_IN_METERS;
brng = bearingInDegrees * ( Math.PI / 180 );
lat2 = Math.asin( Math.sin( lat1 ) * Math.cos( d / R ) + Math.cos( lat1 ) * Math.sin( d / R ) * Math.cos( brng ) );
lon2 = lon1 + Math.atan2( Math.sin( brng ) * Math.sin( d / R ) * Math.cos( lat1 ), Math.cos( d / R ) - Math.sin( lat1 ) * Math.sin( lat2 ) );

return new LatLong( lat2 * ( 180 / Math.PI ), lon2 * ( 180 / Math.PI ) );
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Most of this info was gleaned from: movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html and also: fcc.gov/mb/audio/bickel/distance.html –  eterps Mar 3 '11 at 15:44
    
Minor hickup, lat2 got wrong value. But it seems that I only had to add the "old", lat1, to get the correct result :-) –  pecka85 Mar 4 '11 at 12:29
    
@eterps @pecka85 Okay I'm sorry but this formula goes straight over my head. I just wanted to know whether the distance to the corner of the square is calculated in the formula itself or do we have to do it. And I think at least I can do that. –  Abijeet Patro Dec 12 '12 at 6:21
    
The distance must be calculated yourself. Use the pythagorean theorem. If the shortest distance from the center point to any side of the square is 12, then the distance from the center point to any corner is Sqrt(12^2 + 12^2) = 16.97 –  eterps Dec 12 '12 at 15:57

Here's a solution using GeographicLib, a library that I wrote:

// Assumes GeographicLib, http://geographiclib.sf.net, is installed
// 
// Compile and link with
//   g++ -o foo foo.cpp -L /usr/local/lib -Wl,-rpath=/usr/local/lib -lGeographic

#include <GeographicLib/Geodesic.hpp>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace GeographicLib;
using namespace std;

int main() {
  double lat1, lon1, side;
  cin >> lat1 >> lon1 >> side;
  cout << fixed << setprecision(14);
  double s12 = sqrt(0.5) * side;
  const Geodesic& g = Geodesic::WGS84;
  for (int i = 0; i < 4; ++i) {
    double azi1 = i * 90 - 135;
    double lat2, lon2;
    g.Direct(lat1, lon1, azi1, s12, lat2, lon2);
    cout << lat2 << " " << lon2 << "\n";
  }
  return 0;
}
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I may be oversimplifying the problem, but...

top-left = x - 12, y + 12
top-right = x + 12, y + 12
bottom-left = x - 12, y - 12
bottom-left = x - 12, y - 12

no?

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