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If get the geolocation for an IP address that was stored in a database a year ago, the IP address may have been reassigned since it was stored, so that its current location is not the same as it was at that time. I am wondering if this new location is generally likely to be in the vicinity of the original location (eg, say a change from Ft. Lauderdale to Miami) or whether on the contrary it might get reassigned somewhere entirely different (eg Detroit).

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That is all contingent on the ISP and when they expire the IP; how the pooling works, etc... I wouldn't count on any verifiable behavior. –  Aaron McIver Mar 3 '11 at 18:33
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Frankly, I don't think they can before they get reassigned either. –  T.E.D. Mar 3 '11 at 18:34
    
@T.E.D. I imagine they must at least be semi-reliable or else presumably people wouldn't pay for geolocation services. For my application, 90% reliability within 100 miles is fine, so the bar is low. –  jela Mar 3 '11 at 18:56
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You'd be surprised what people will pay for. I used to regularly get websites thinking I lived in Oklahoma City instead of Tulsa because my ISP (the owner of the ip addresses) was there. –  T.E.D. Mar 3 '11 at 20:59
    
people all the time pay for "cancer" treatments that don't work. The vendor gets away with it because the patient dies before he can sue. This is about the same thing - you need geolocation, so you pay for it - even though it's inherently unreliable. –  John Saunders Mar 18 '11 at 1:40
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"people all the time pay for "cancer" treatments that don't work. The vendor gets away with it because the patient dies before he can sue...you need geolocation, so you pay for it - even though it's inherently unreliable. – John Saunders Mar 18 '11 at 1:40"

Correct. And its MUCH worse than that. Deliberate mis-geolocation along with criminal interference to public databases IS being used to electronically hide people. Accurate and meaningful Geolocation is evidently as likely as being paid a Euromillions Jackpot if youre not someone who is engaged in organised crime.

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