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I understand what prototypal inheritance is all about, but I must be confused as to the implementation. I thought that modifying a function constructor's prototype would affect all instances of that constructor, but this isn't the case. How does JS do the method lookup from an object to its prototype?

Here's an example

function A(name){
  this.name = name;
}

a = new A("brad");

A.prototype = {
  talk: function(){
    return "hello " + this.name;
  }
}

a.talk() // doesn't work
b = new A("john");
b.talk() // works

I was under the impression that a would look for the method talk() in A's prototype, so any modification to A's prototype, before or after a was instantiated would be reflected, but this doesn't seem to be the case. Can someone explain this for me?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's the difference between modifying and replacing the prototype.

function A(name){
  this.name = name;
}

a = new A("brad");
// Change, don't replace.
A.prototype.talk = function(){
    return "hello " + this.name;
};

a.talk() // works
b = new A("john");
b.talk() // works

Here is what is going on:

// Continued from above
var old_proto = A.prototype;

// Nuke that proto
A.prototype = {
talk: function() {
    return "goodbye " + this.name;
}
};

var c = new A("Al");

a.talk() // hello brad
b.talk() // hello john
c.talk() // goodbye Al

old_proto.say_goodbye = function() {
    return "goodbye " + this.name;
};

a.say_goodbye() // goodbye brad
b.say_goodbye() // goodbye john
c.say_goodbye() // TypeError c.say_goodbye is not a function.
share|improve this answer
    
so in my first case, a's prototype is pointing to a different object? –  brad Mar 3 '11 at 19:00
    
@brad -- yes, that is exactly what is happening. –  Sean Vieira Mar 3 '11 at 19:03
    
@brad -- added a bit more explanation. –  Sean Vieira Mar 3 '11 at 19:10
1  
makes perfect sense... thanks for the thorough explanation! –  brad Mar 3 '11 at 19:27
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In support of Sean's good answer: there's nothing wrong with replacing the entire prototype, as long as you do it before you create instances of the object. This also works:

function A(name){
  this.name = name;
}

A.prototype = {
  talk: function(){
    return "hello " + this.name;
  }
}

a = new A("brad");

a.talk() // works

Just be sure not to replace it later (unless that's what you're trying to do).

In your original example A didn't have your custom prototype at the time you created your first instance, but it did have it when you created your second one, because you created the prototype in between.

The prototype chain is established when an object is instantiated, so it's possible for two instances of the same "class" to have different prototypes, as you demonstrated.

This can cause all kinds of trouble:

var a = new A("brad");
console.log(a instanceof A) // true

A.prototype = {
  talk: function(){
    return "hello " + this.name;
  }
}

console.log(a instanceof A) // false

The object referred to by a is no longer considered an instance of A because instanceof works by checking if A.prototype is in the prototype chain of a.

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ya I'm aware of the ordering issues, I wasn't however aware of the difference in replacing vs modifying of the prototype. Thanks for the extra clarification though –  brad Mar 3 '11 at 19:10
1  
To word it a bit differently even, when you create a new object instance with "new", the following happens: 1.) Create an empty object and run the constructor in the scope of that object. 2.) Set the new object instance's prototype property to the constructor's prototype property. Thus as lwburk has said, when the prototype is set, A.prototype is something else. –  XHR Mar 3 '11 at 19:11
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