Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two classes, Foo and Bar. Each Foo has a name and a bunch of items. Bar contains a bunch of Foo's, each with a unique name.

Bar has a method, AddEntry that takes a fooName and an item (1) if a foo with fooName is already in the Bar, adds another item to the Foo or (2) if a foo with fooName is not in the Bar, creates a Foo with that name and add the item to the new Foo.

This is an outline of how I'm implementing. Is there a better way? I'm just learning Java, but this seems clunky

class Foo { // a name and some items
    String fooName;
    List<Object> items = new ArrayList<Object>;
    Foo(name) {...} // create a named Foo
    AddtoFoo(item) {...} // add an item to this Foo
}

class Bar { // a bunch of foo's
    List<Foo> fooList = new Arraylist<Foo>;

    void AddEntry(String fooName, Object item) {
        boolean member = false;
        for(Foo foo : fooList){
            if{foo.name == fooName) {
                member = true;
                foo.AddtoFoo(item); // adds an item to this foo
                break;
             }
        }
        if(member == false) {
            Foo foo = new Foo(fooName); // creates a named foo
            foo.AddtoFoo(item);  // adds the item
            fooList.add(foo);  // maintain our list of foo's
        }

    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
You should compare String equality by using foo.name.equals(fooName) –  Jeremy Heiler Mar 3 '11 at 19:02
    
Is your example complete, or merely a representation? If it's complete, you could use a Map<String, List<Object>> to store everything, and then use the contains method on map for adding the items. –  Mikezx6r Mar 3 '11 at 19:04
    
It's a representation, but the key is that Bar contains a list of Foos, each of which has a name and a list of items. –  foosion Mar 3 '11 at 19:07
1  
<goes off to read up on map, given the trend in comments so far> –  foosion Mar 3 '11 at 19:11
add comment

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd use a Map<String, Foo> to map the foo name to a foo object.

Map<String, Foo> fooMap = new HashMap<String, Foo>();

Thus you could do

Foo foo = fooMap.get(fooName);
if( foo == null)
{
  foo = new Foo(fooName);
  fooMap.put(fooName, foo);
}
foo.AddtoFoo(item); 
share|improve this answer
    
That works nicely. –  foosion Mar 3 '11 at 19:54
add comment

In bar class you should use HashMap instead of ArrayList with FooName as key and Foo as pair. Since HashMap has o(1) searchingtime which you are doing with a for loop itreation in arraylist.

share|improve this answer
    
Tried not to give away code snippet thinking @foosion is learning :) –  Ankur Mar 3 '11 at 19:19
add comment

You probably want to use a Map instead, which you can look up an object by a key.

Map<String,Foo> fooMap = new HashMap<String,Foo>();
foo.put("name_of_foo",new Foo());

Then your addEntry might look like this:

void addEntry(String fooName, Object item){
    Foo foo = fooMap.get(fooName);
    if(foo == null){
       foo = new Foo();
       fooMap.put(fooName,foo);
    }
    foo.addToFoo(item);
}

Also, you should compare String equality by using foo.name.equals(fooName)

share|improve this answer
    
That also works nicely. –  foosion Mar 3 '11 at 19:57
add comment

You could try using a HashMap in Bar, instead of using a List. Use the fooName as unique key. This way, in Bar you can check if the instance of Foo is already known in your current bar much faster (just something along the lines of this):

Map<String, Foo> fooMap = new HashMap<String, Foo>();

... 
Foo foo = fooMap.get(fooName);
if(foo == null)
{
   fooMap.add(fooName, new Foo(fooName));
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

If foo's name is just there for the lookup, perhaps a Map<String,List<Foo>> (and removing Foo.name) would save you from coding that much.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Unless the foo must stay in the same order, you could replace your list of foos with a Map<String, Foo>. Searching for an existing foo would become a O(1) operation rather than a O(n) operation.

Even if the foos must stay ordered, you could use a LinkedHashMap.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This is correct but if your are looking for the right foo object, instead of using a List, use a Map, like the HashMap. Use as key the fooName and as value the Foo object. Get the object you are looking with get(fooName)and if returns null, does not exists and the add a new Foo with put().

share|improve this answer
add comment

The best way and more maintainable way would be to use hashCode and use contains.

public int hashCode() { return fooName.hashCode(); }

This is must faster than for: loop. Althought it doesn't provide you O(1) complexity but it guarantees (theoretically) fixed retrieval ~ O(1)

Also get() method does the same on hashMap. It uses hashCode to retrieve the object from the Map.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.