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I am still having a hard time wrapping my head around this. I want to separate my layers (dlls) like so:

1) MyProject.Web.dll - MVC Web App (Controllers, Models (Edit/View), Views)
2) MyProject.Services.dll - Service Layer (Business Logic)
3) MyProject.Repositories.dll - Repositories
4) MyProject.Domain.dll - POCO Classes
5) MyProject.Data.dll - EF4

Workflow:

1) Controllers call Services to get objects to populate View/Edit Models.
2) Services call Repositories to get/persist objects.
3) Repositories call EF to get/persist objects to and from SQL Server.

My Repositories return IQueryable(Of T) and inside them they utilize ObjectSet(Of T).

So as I see this, the layers depend on exactly the next layer down and the lib that contains the POCO classes?

A few concerns:

1) Now for my Repositories to work correctly with EF, they will depend on System.Data.Objects, now I have a tight coupling with EF in my repository layer, is that bad?

2) I am using the UnitOfWork pattern. Where should that live? It has a Property Context As ObjectContext, so that is tightly coupled to EF as well. Bad?

3) How can i use DI to make this easier?

I want this to be a loosely coupled as possible for testing. Any suggestions?

---------- Edit ----------

Please let me know if I am on the right track here. Also, so the Service gets injected with an IRepository(Of Category) right, how does it know the difference between that and the concrete class of EFRepository(Of T)? Same with the UnitOfWork and the Service?

Once someone helps me figure this out to where I understand it, I know it will have seemed trivial, but man I am having a heck of a time wrapping my head around this!!

Controller

Public Class CategoryController
    Private _Service As Domain.Interfaces.IService

    Public Sub New(ByVal Service As Domain.Interfaces.IService)
        _Service = Service

    End Sub

    Function ListCategories() As ActionResult
        Dim Model As New CategoryViewModel

        Using UOW As New Repositories.EFUnitOfWork
            Mapper.Map(Of Category, CategoryViewModel)(_Service.GetCategories)
        End Using

        Return View(Model)
    End Function

End Class

Service

Public Class CategoryService

    Private Repository As Domain.Interfaces.IRepository(Of Domain.Category)
    Private UnitOfWork As Domain.Interfaces.IUnitOfWork

    Public Sub New(ByVal UnitOfWork As Domain.Interfaces.IUnitOfWork, ByVal Repository As Domain.Interfaces.IRepository(Of Domain.Category))
        UnitOfWork = UnitOfWork
        Repository = Repository

    End Sub

    Public Function GetCategories() As IEnumerable(Of Domain.Category)
        Return Repository.GetAll()
    End Function

End Class

Repository and UnitOfWork

Public MustInherit Class RepositoryBase(Of T As Class)
    Implements Domain.Interfaces.IRepository(Of T)

End Class

Public Class EFRepository(Of T As Class)
    Inherits RepositoryBase(Of T)

End Class

Public Class EFUnitOfWork
    Implements Domain.Interfaces.IUnitOfWork

    Public Property Context As ObjectContext

    Public Sub Commit() Implements Domain.Interfaces.IUnitOfWork.Commit

    End Sub

End Class
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Original Answer

  1. No. However, to avoid coupling the Services to this, have an ISomethingRepository interface in your domain layer. This will be resolved by your IoC container.

  2. The Unit of Work patterns should be implemented with your Repositories. Use the same solution to decoupling this as I suggested with decoupling your repositories from your services. Create an IUnitOfWork or IUnitOfWork<TContext> in your domain layer, and put the implementation in your Repository layer. I don't see any reason that your repository implementation needs to be separate from your Data layer, if all the Repositories do is persist data to the ObjectContext in data layer. The Repository interface is domain logic, but the implementation is a data concern

  3. You can use DI to inject your services into the controllers and your repositories into your services. With DI, your service will have a dependency on the repository interface ISomethingRepository, and will receive the implementation of the EFSomethingRepository without being coupled to the data/repository assembly. Basically, your IControllerFactory implementation will get the IoC container to provide all the constructor dependencies for the Controller. This will require that the IoC container also provides all the controllers' constructor dependencies (service) their constructor dependencies (repositories) as well. All of your assemblies will have a dependency on your domain layer, (which has the repository and service interfaces), but will not have dependencies on each other, because they are dependent on the interface and not the implementation. You will either need a separate assembly for the Dependency Resolution or you will need to include that code in your Web project. ( I would recommend a separate assembly). The only assembly with a dependency on the Dependency Resolution assembly will be the UI assembly, although even this is not completely necessary if you use an IHttpModule implementation to register your dependencies at the Application_Start event (the project will still need a copy of the dll in your bin folder, but a project reference is not necessary). There are plenty of suitable open source IoC containers. The best one depends a lot on what you choose. I personally like StructureMap. Both it, and Ninject are reliable and well documented DI frameworks.

Response to Sam Striano's Edits

It's been years since I've coded in VB so my syntax may be off.

Public Class CategoryController
  Private _Service As Domain.Interfaces.IService

  'This is good.
  Public Sub New(ByVal Service As Domain.Interfaces.IService)
      _Service = Service
  End Sub


  Function ListCategories() As ActionResult
      Dim Model As New CategoryViewModel


      Using UOW As New Repositories.EFUnitOfWork

This doesn't need to be in the controller. Move it into the Repository and have it surround the actual transaction. Also, you don't want your controller to have a dependency on the data layer.

          Mapper.Map(Of Category, CategoryViewModel)(_Service.GetCategories)

Is this a call to AutoMapper? Not related to your original question, but, you should relocate the mapping functionality to an ActionFilter so your return is just Return View(_Service.GetCategories)

      End Using

      Return View(Model)
  End Function

The Service class had no problems.

The Repository and Unit of Work look mostly incomplete. Your Repository should new up the ObjectContext and inject it into the Unit of Work, then execute all transactions in the scope of the Unit of Work (similar to what you did in the controller). The problem with having it in the Controller is it's possible that a single Service call could be scoped to multiple units of work. Here is a good article on how to implement Unit of Work. http://martinfowler.com/eaaCatalog/unitOfWork.html. Martin Fowler's books and website are great sources of information on these types of topics.

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1  
I updated my answer. (1) Yes. (2) Yes. The concrete class is in the MyProject.Data.dll, and the MyProject.Repositories.dll merges with the MyProject.Data.dll as well. –  smartcaveman Mar 3 '11 at 19:25
1  
@sam the repository interfaces can be in anywhere, I'd often have them in a Core project and have the implementations in a Data project –  dove Mar 3 '11 at 19:27
1  
@dove, so you read MVC in Action too? As you can see, he doesn't have a 'Core' project. The closes thing to that is the Domain project. Aside from that we are giving the same advice. –  smartcaveman Mar 3 '11 at 19:30
1  
@Sam Striano, I highly suggest reading this article on 'The Onion Architecture': jeffreypalermo.com/blog/the-onion-architecture-part-1. It gives in depth explanation for many of your questions. Also, the books Mvc in Action and Mvc 2 in Action is another great source (partially written by the author of that article). –  smartcaveman Mar 3 '11 at 19:31
1  
@Sam Striano, I don't really have time to write a sample application for an SO question. There are plenty of open source solutions for this. I would recommend looking at CodeCampServer which is the sample application for the book I recommended earlier. I believe I have sufficiently answered your question, but if you would like to discuss this on a more in depth/project-specific level I can be reached at smartcaveman@gmail.com –  smartcaveman Mar 4 '11 at 0:07
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To answer your concerns in order

1) Not necessarily bad, kind of depends on how likely you are to stick with EF. There are several things you could do to reduce this. One relatively low cost (assuming you have some Inversion of Control setup, if not skip to 3) is to only reference interfaces of your repositories from your services.

2) Same again, I think you could spend a lot of time not making your application not coupled to EF but you have to ask yourself if this change of direction would not make for other changes as well. Again, a layer of indirection could be brought in through interfacing and easily swap out one repository implementation with another later.

3) Inversion of Control should again allow all the testing you'd want. Thus no need for many direct references at all and to test any layer in isolation.

UPDATE for requested sample.

public class QuestionService : IQuestionService
{

    private readonly IQuestionRepository _questionRepository;

    public QuestionService(IQuestionRepository questionRepository){
           _questionRepository = questionRepository
    }
}

Thus your service only knows of an interface which can be mocked or faked within your unit tests. It is all pretty standard IoC stuff. There is lots of good reference out there on this, if a lot of this is new to you then I'd recommend some a book to give you the full story.

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Could you edit you answer to show some very basic code examples? Thank You!! –  Sam Mar 3 '11 at 19:16
    
With DI, could you inject multiple repositories? Think of a CustomerService, it would have a CustomerRepository and then also an OrderRepository to deal with orders for the customer? –  Sam Mar 3 '11 at 19:39
    
IOC is about sooo much more than just testing –  Will Du Mar 3 '11 at 19:46
    
@Will Du you are correct but I wasn't suggesting it was, I was answering his question which was asking specifically "for testing"... –  dove Mar 3 '11 at 21:13
    
Will you please have a look at my edit above and see what you think? –  Sam Mar 3 '11 at 23:23
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I would suggest using MEF. It gives you the dependency injection framework you want but it isn't full-fledged; it's excellent for unit test. Here are a few answers to a related question: Simplifying Testing through design considerations while utilizing dependency injection

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Full code exmple can be found here with MEF and Repository Pattern (also uses EFCodeFirst).

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